Artists Robert Marcel Lepage

Robert Lepage has made so many CDs, STRIPs, SCOREs, and HONKs, that you have to wonder if he has some secret power-breakfast. He gets up very early to compose music for TV series (Urgences, Belphégor) before stealing away to the pool to stretch out lengthways (he wouldn’t do it anywhere else). By 9 o’clock he is back in the studio with other musicians to create music for the stage, for dance (Lucie Grégoire’s Hatysa) and for documentaries (Werner Vokmer’s Roussil, Manon Barbeau’s Les Enfants du Refus global). In the afternoon, he watches full-length films for which he will record new music the next day (Bernard Émond’s 20h17 rue Darling, Rodrigue Jean’s Yellowknife). He sometimes gets together with colleagues later in the afternoon to improvise or to talk about the music they want to do or collaborate on. He even puts on the occasional show in which his compositions share the stage with his strange, original ideas. Don’t miss him on these occasions or else you’ll have to try the pool.

[English translation: François Couture, vii-03]

Robert Marcel Lepage

Montréal (Québec), 1951

Residence: Montréal (Québec)

  • Composer
  • Performer (clarinet, saxophone)

On the web

Robert Marcel Lepage [Photo: Céline Lalonde, March 2003]
Robert Marcel Lepage [Photo: Céline Lalonde, March 2003]
  • Robert Marcel Lepage
  • Robert Marcel Lepage
  • Robert Marcel Lepage

Appearances

Ora / ORA 07062 / 2003

In the press

  • Réjean Beaucage, Voir, January 1, 2017
    L’ajout du Quatuor Bozzini dans la recette agrandit singulièrement l’univers sonore du duo…
  • Chris Kelsey, Cadence, no. 23:5, May 1, 1997
  • AR, Octopus, no. 6, April 1, 1997
    C’est incroyable comme ses compositions faites de séquences et d’orchestres forment un monde cohérent, en dépit du nombre exponentiel d’idées qui traversent ce disque.

Critique

Réjean Beaucage, Voir, January 1, 2017
L’ajout du Quatuor Bozzini dans la recette agrandit singulièrement l’univers sonore du duo…

Review

Chris Kelsey, Cadence, no. 23:5, May 1, 1997

The most interesting thing about this CD of mostly free improvisation is the opportunity it affords us to monitor the artists’ progress from 1984, when the first seven tracks were recorded, to 1996, when cuts 8 through 16 were laid down. In ’84, both Lussier and Lepage were well on their way to developing their own voices, though both were still manifestly groping. Lussier’s style was a mechanistic abstract-expressionism; his timbres were harsh, his lines jagged, his melodies and hammonies of little consequence given his extreme textural freedom. By ’96, the guitarist has his materials under control. The rough edges are leH that way purposely; they are no longer perceived as accidents. Lussier’s increased skills have given his work a more humane cast- ironic, perhaps, given this album’s stated intent, which is as a parody of our mechanized consumer society. Lepage’s development is similar. Where in ’84 he was searching - playing two saxes simultaneously, manipulating his tone and articulating in an extreme and sometimes clumsy manner - by’96 his chops are together. The harshness is leavened by a control that wasn’t there twelve years earlier. The mature Lepage concentrates on clarinet, upon which he has a comprehensive technique; hence, his lines are informed by a melodic sense that was far less pronounced on the earlier date. The duo benefits from the individual evolution of the piayers. Where, in the first recordings, the improvising moves in a more parallel direction - the players’limitations prohibit a more integrated, interactive perfommance - the later tracks are far more well-coordinated. The’84 cuts were made by a pair of talented students; the recent tracks by mature fine artists. Consequently, we have one-half of a very fine album - enough, I think, for me to recommend it.

Critique

AR, Octopus, no. 6, April 1, 1997

Vous rêvez de découvrir un compositeur mélant dérision, inventivité et sens de l’orchestration. Vous êtes prêt a passer une petite annonce utopique pour trouver quelqu’un répondant à ce profil rare: un inclassable aux idées larges et au style unique. Vous alliez même engager un chasseur de têtes… êcoutez donc René Lussier. Il campe, sur la photo du livret CD, assis sur un banc à côté de son vélo, prêt â partir. Son sourire est malicieux et plein de sympathie. Fin du travail, c’est le titre de son premier album. C’est incroyable comme ses compositions faites de séquences et d’orchestres forment un monde cohérent, en dépit du nombre exponentiel d’idées qui traversent ce disque. Vous aimez Hugues le Bars, Albert Marcoeur, vous attendiez un renouveau chez Comelade, vous aimeriez que la musique contemporaine fuse en éclats de rire. Ecoutez René Lussier qui campe â côté de son vélo!

C’est incroyable comme ses compositions faites de séquences et d’orchestres forment un monde cohérent, en dépit du nombre exponentiel d’idées qui traversent ce disque.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.