Artists Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay is a composer and a performer on bass guitar and sound processing devices, in solo and within various ensembles. He is a member of the London-based collective Loop. His music is released by empreintes DIGITALes and Ora.

He formally studied composition with Michel Tétreault, Marcelle Deschênes, and Jonty Harrison, bass guitar with Jean-Guy Larin, Sylvain Bolduc, and Michel Donato, analysis with Michel Longtin and Stéphane Roy, studio technique with Francis Dhomont, Robert Normandeau, and Jean Piché.

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay is Professor in Composition and Improvisation at the University of Huddersfield (England, UK). He previously worked in popular music as producer and bassist, and has a keen interest for creative coding.

He likes spending time with his family, drinking oolong tea, gazing at dictionaries, reading prose, and taking long walks. As a founding member of the no-tv collective, he does not own a working television set.

In 2016 he was awarded the Jules Léger Prize for New Chamber Music organized by the Canada Council for the Arts.

[iv-18]

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay

Montréal (Québec), 1975

Residence: Huddersfield (England, UK)

  • Composer
  • Performer (electric bass, laptop)

info@pierrealexandretremblay.com

Associated Groups

On the Web

Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (England, UK), August 3, 2013
Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (England, UK), August 3, 2013
  • Jean-François Denis is receiving (on behalf of Pierre Alexandre Tremblay visible on the big screen) the Prix Opus 2013-14 “Album of the year — actuelle and electroacoustic musics” at the 18th Gala des Prix Opus at Salle Bourgie in Montréal. The hosts of the event are Pierre Vachon and Stanley Péan, photo: Anis Hammoud / CQM, Montréal (Québec), February 1, 2015
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay (on the screen of an iPad held up by Jean-François Denis) receiving the Prix Opus 2010-11 “Album of the year — actuelle and electroacoustic musics” at the 15th Gala des Prix Opus at Salle Bourgie in Montréal. The host of the event is Mario Paquet (on the right side), photo: CQM, Montréal (Québec), January 29, 2012
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Alex Bonney, Paris (France), May 24, 2011
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Alex Bonney, Strasbourg (Bas-Rhin, France), May 24, 2011
  • Jonty Harrison, Jean-François Denis, Denis Smalley, Pierre Alexandre Tremblay at the afternoon rehearshal for the concert empreintes DIGITALes @ 20: Cinema for the Ears as part of the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, photo: Scott Hewitt, Huddersfield (England, UK), November 24, 2010
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Claudine Levasseur, Huddersfield (England, UK), January 17, 2009
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Étienne Deslières
  • Pierre Alexandre Tremblay, photo: Étienne Deslières

Selected Works

Main Releases

empreintes DIGITALes / IMED 13123/124, IMED 13123_NUM / 2013
empreintes DIGITALes / IMED 11109, IMED 11109_NUM / 2011
Ora / ORA 15115 / 2011
empreintes DIGITALes / IMED 0999, IMED 0999_NUM / 2009
empreintes DIGITALes / IMED 0680, IMED 0680_NUM / 2006

Appearances

Collection QB / CQB 1618 / 2016
empreintes DIGITALes / IMED 0898, IMED 0898_NUM / 2008
Ora / ORA 12095 / 2008
Ora / ORA 11089 / 2007
Ora / ORA 09075 / 2005

In the Press

HCMF 2018: HISS@10, Kudzu, Fast Gold Butterflies

Simon Cummings, 5:4, November 22, 2018

[…] The only other work of substance in this concert was Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s Bucolic & Broken. And what substance! Here, and only here, was a true demonstration of the surround capabilities of HISS. But it wasn’t just the positioning of sounds, Tremblay’s choice of sources – ranging from a scratching pencil to a boiling kettle to birdsong to a tinkling piano gesture to a woman walking her dog – were superbly imaginative, and the way these were juxtaposed into a strange structural form was unconventional but completely convincing. It wasn’t in the usual sense acousmatic, Tremblay instead presenting these sounds as found sound objects arranged into a kind of spacialised collage. But what set the piece apart from almost everything else in this concert (and, perhaps, most concerts) was its demonstration of Tremblay’s very obvious playfulness and a palpable sense of wonder at the sounds he’s working with. For electronic music to be as accomplished as this while being so much fun is a rare combination. […]

For electronic music to be as accomplished as this while being so much fun is a rare combination.

HCMF 2018: United Instruments of Lucilin, Harriet

Simon Cummings, 5:4, November 21, 2018

[…] In Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s electroacoustic Un fil rouge the electronics were for the most part uncannily present – which is to say that they felt like a tangible yet invisible additional performer on stage. They manifested most prominently in a recurring motif, extending the ensemble’s tutti accents into an accelerating (and occasionally decelerating) sequence of impacts. This motif recurred so often, in fact, that it became in essence a refrain, between which were a number of episodes providing a contrast to its impetus and momentum. Though they exhibited far less energy, these episodes were the most striking moments of the piece, Tremblay more prepared to let the material drift and linger, resulting in beautiful, dreamy sequences. Even when they were pushed along, though, this episodes remained distinct in the way they seemed more ragged, the result of playful spontaneity driven by an exciting bubbling sense of abandon. […]

… in beautiful, dreamy sequences.

HCMF 2016: Seth Parker Woods […]

Simon Cummings, 5:4, November 26, 2016

Friday at HCMF began with a recital by rising star cellist Seth Parker Woods. I’ve had the opportunity to see Woods play once before (at HCMF 2014) and the experience was a highly impressive one, so I was very much looking forward to seeing him in action again. He did not disappoint, performing four challenging works, two of which involved live electronics. […] The unquestionable highlight of the concert, though, was Pierre Alexandre Tremblay’s asinglewordisnotenough3 (invariant), which provided both a composition masterclass in its seamless, aurally non-hierarchical interaction between acoustic and electronic, as well as a performance masterclass in its bravura display of frantic virtuosity from Woods. The work’s narrative was excellent, progressing through a series of evolving episodes each fuelled by the cello, many of them rhythmically taut (though never sounding metrically fixed) with a tendency later to expand out into more sustained soundscapes where the cello’s material was more buoyant. Utterly thrilling, and Woods unstoppable performance was outstanding. […]

… a composition masterclass in its seamless, aurally non-hierarchical interaction between acoustic and electronic…

Blog

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.