electrocd

Review

Dean Suzuki, Option, no. 45, July 1, 1992

These two extended radiophonic works by young Canadian composers have a sinister outlook and are quite fascinating. The solo female vocal lines in Brégent’s Atlantide often recall the writing of Daniel Lentz, with similar modular (though never minimalist) construction and pure, straight singing sans vibrato. At other times, the writing is for chamber choir (with vibrato) and various acoustic, electric and electronic instruments wherein the work becomes densely polyphonic, with layer upon layer of melody, color and rhythm. At times the onslaught of sonic information is dizzying. The music itself seems to be informed by rock, industrial, post-modernism and the avant-garde, all without a hint of posturing. Composer Boudreau and writer Duguay’s Golgot(h)a is a powerfully melodramatic work of Ivesian eclecticism, invoking the influential French progressive rock band Magma with similar distorted vocal passages in an unknown tongue, as well as a dolorous demeanor and murky, sullen harmonies and textures. Alongside are bits of Renaissance and Baroque music, inviting comparisons with Giovanni Gabrieli’s polychoral brass or lush Palestrinian vocal polyphony, as well as spiky, updated Stravinskian harmonies.

… the work becomes densely polyphonic, with layer upon layer of melody, color and rhythm.