Review

Glen Hall, Exclaim!, October 24, 2013

French electronic composer François Bayle is one of the most distinguished artists in his field. At long last, his nine-part 1982 composition, Les couleurs de la nuit, has been given a beautifully packaged CD and clear vinyl release. [The work] starts with intensity: Animé (“Lively”) is a rush of vaporous sibilance, swampy croaks and a choir of crickets, while Couleurs froissées (“Crushed Colours”) features a stuttering clarinet motif over insistent electronic wavelets. Contrary to the expectation its title might conjure up, Nuit noire (“Black Night”) is fast-paced and relentless, with sounds appearing, disappearing, alternating, and reiterating at a torrential pace (though Bayle’s use of a chromatically modulating two-note motif does wear out its welcome). The defining characteristic of Les couleurs de la nuit is its tireless creative action, with its rampant activity of new sounds, rhythms and contrasts never letting up. 8/10

… its tireless creative action, with its rampant activity of new sounds, rhythms and contrasts never letting up.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.