Clair de terre (CD) Track listing detail

Malina

Robert Normandeau

  • Year of composition: 2000
  • Duration: 15:02
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: IMEB

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114390

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
To Brigitte Haentjens

At the origin of the work is a play — an adaptation from the 1971 novel by Ingeborg Bachmann (Austria, 1926-73), Malina — presented in Montréal in September 2000.

The stage adaptation, a poetic reading of Bachmann’s novel, makes use of the unsaid, silence, and atmosphere in a way that allows the music a place that it seldom enjoys in theater. It became clear from the beginning that the ideal instrument for this meditation was the shakuhachi. As the work progressed it became increasingly evident that the music would have to be an omnipresent element in the play. The absolute confidence that the director showed me on this question allowed me to develop the music through a creative process similar to the one I use when writing concert music.

I want to thank Brigitte Haentjens, without whom this music would not exist, for commissioning the work, certainly, but above all for the confidence that she showed during its creation. I would also like to take the opportunity to thank the entire production staff of Malina. Finally, my special thanks goes to Claire Marchand for her playing of the shakuhachi, the truly fascinating instrument that provided the sole and unique material for the work, and for which she adapted the techniques of modern flute playing, her principal instrument.


Malina was realized in 1999-2000 at the studios of the Institut international de musique électroacoustique de Bourges (IMEB, France) and at the composer’s studio and premiered on June 17, 2000 during the Synthèse festival (Bourges, France). Malina (the concert piece) was commissioned by the IMEB (France).


Premiere

  • June 17, 2000, Synthèse 2000: Concert, Bourges (Cher, France)

Awards

Erinyes

Robert Normandeau

  • Year of composition: 2001
  • Duration: 20:08
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Sonorities Festival with support from the National Lottery through the Arts Council of Northern Ireland

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114400

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
To Anne-Marie Cadieux

At the center of this work is the voice. The voice, but without words — only onomatopoeias, as recited by the actors in Electra by Sophocles (in a production by Brigitte Haentjens that was presented at Espace GO in Montréal in April 2000) for which I composed the music. In Greek mythology, the Erinyes were guardians of human life whose duty it was to pursue and punish wrongdoers. They were known as “the keepers of the shadows.”

The principal sound treatment was designed to bring out the primitive nature of the voice — the interior resonance that is so deeply rooted in the human unconscious. This treatment is called “freeze.” At first glance this may seem absurd, given that music is something that exists in time, but the computer allows the composer to stop time. Voices can be ‘frozen’ and thoroughly explored from within. Erinyes is the fourth piece in the Onomatopœia cycle (the three preceding pieces being Éclats de voix, Spleen, and Le renard et la rose).


Erinyes was realized at the composer’s studio in 2001 and premiered on May 5, 2001 at the Sonorities Festival in Belfast (Northern Ireland, UK). The piece was commissioned by the Sonorities Festival with support from the National Lottery of the Arts Council of Northern Ireland. The recorded voices are those of actors Marc Béland, Anne-Marie Cadieux, Anne Dorval, Denis Gravereaux, Andrée Lachapelle, and Christiane Pasquier and director Brigitte Haentjens. Thanks to Michael Alcorn.


Premiere

  • May 5, 2001, Sonorities 2001: Profile of the work of Robert Normandeau, Harty Room — Music Building — Queen’s University, Belfast (Northern Ireland, UK)

Clair de terre

Robert Normandeau

  • Year of composition: 1999, 2009
  • Duration: 36:00
  • Instrumentation: 16-channel fixed medium

A photograph of the Earth taken from space probably best epitomizes the second half of the twentieth century. It situates our planet in space in a way that makes it clear that the Earth is not at the center of the universe. Our place in space leads to a state of unbalance that is reflected in the way we see the world. This new perception in turn influences our artistic expression. Electroacoustic music was born just slightly more than fifty years ago, at about the same time that first photograph of the earth was taken. This has brought about a considerable change in how we (artists) make and how we (the audience) hear.

This work is divided into twelve movements that systematically explore elements of the grammar of cinematography that have been transposed into the language of electroacoustics. Preceded by an overture — Ouverture — each of these twelve movements are composed of a soundscape, an object’s sound, the sound of a musical instrument, and vocal onomatopoeias. All of these sound elements are drawn from the sound bank that I have built up over the last ten years.


Clair de terre was realized at the composer’s studio in 1999 and premiered on December 10, 1999 during the Rien à voir (6) concert series presented by Réseaux at Ex-Centris in Montréal. The work was realized with support from the Canada Council for the Arts (CCA) and the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ). Some passages in the work are drawn from music or sound elements composed for plays and the radio. Thanks to André Corriveau, Jean-François Denis, Monique Desroches, Julien Grégoire, Brigitte Haentjens, Odile Magnan, Denis Marleau, Lorraine Pintal, Jacinthe Potvin, Rober Racine, Claire Savoie, and Claude Schryer.


Premiere

  • December 10, 1999, Rien à voir (6): concert solo, eXcentris, Montréal (Québec)

Clair de terre, 1: Ouverture

Robert Normandeau

  • Duration: 6:12

Stereo

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Premiere

  • February 17, 2016, Premiere of the 16-channel version (2016): The Electric Space Concert Series 2015-16: Concert 3, Bevegelseslab — Institutt for musikkvitenskap — ZEB-bygningen — Universitetet i Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

Clair de terre, 2: Cadre étroit (espace clos)

Robert Normandeau

  • Duration: 2:31

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114420

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Clair de terre, 3: Couleurs primaires et secondaires

Robert Normandeau

  • Duration: 2:59

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114430

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Clair de terre, 8: Clarté (éblouissement)

Robert Normandeau

  • Duration: 2:57

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114480

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Clair de terre, 13: Cadre large (espace ouvert)

Robert Normandeau

  • Duration: 3:40

Stereo

ISRC CAD500114530

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.