electrocd

Track listing detail

They’re Trying to Save Themselves

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2002
  • Duration: 3:53
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: CBC
  • ISWC: T0728363845

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620100

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

They’re Trying to Save Themselves was commissioned for a commemorative radio broadcast of the first anniversary of 9/11. The sounds are all taken from an eyewitness account aired on CNN immediately following the tragedy. The spoken words undergo a number of textural metamorphoses in the piece that evoke different sound images relating to the events of September 11th, such as low-flying aircraft, panicking voices, and other sonorities.

[i-05]


They’re Trying to Save Themselves was realized in 2002 at the composer’s studio and premiered on September 11, 2002 on CBC Radio One. The piece was commissioned by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) for the commemorative broadcast “Loss and Legacy.”

Premiere

  • September 11, 2002, Loss and Legacy, Radio One — CBC, Canada

Composition

Mastering

Streams of Whispers

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2002
  • Duration: 12:41
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0713782309

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620110

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

Streams of Whispers was originally completed in October 2001 as a sound installation for the stairwell of the Latvian House in Toronto during an audio art residency at Charles Street Video. The idea behind the installation was to think of the stairwell as a place of migration or transition, or perhaps more figuratively like a current of water through which particles of sound flow from one point to another. The concert version included on this recording condenses the 45-minute composition for the installation into 12 minutes. All of the sound material used in the piece is derived from the spoken and whispered phonemes of the title.

[i-05]


Streams of Whispers was realized in 2002 at the composer’s studio and premiered on October 17, 2002 at the Bowling Green New Music and Art Festival (Bowling Green, OH, USA).

Premiere

  • October 17, 2002, Bowling Green New Music and Art Festival, Bowling Green (Ohio, USA)

Composition

Mastering

The Wrong Mistakes

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2003
  • Duration: 4:34
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0728363823

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620120

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

Although I can’t help making mistakes, it is important to me that I don’t make “the wrong mistakes,” an expression coined by the baseball great Yogi Berra. Making the “wrong mistakes” to me means failing to commit entirely in the moment to an important decision when it counts the most. I think that you can get everything wrong again and again, but if you learn from those experiences there will come a time when you do the right thing at the right time. People who stand out in History are never infallible, but I believe that more often than not they did the right thing when it mattered the most.

For me this piece is about diving into something without caution and trying things I would not normally try, knowing that down the line there were going to be mistakes — something that was abnormally loud, or a sound that seemed out of place. Instead of deleting these apparent mistakes I decided to work with these anomalies, and integrate them into the piece. I did this because the right thing for me to do at this point in my artistic life was to break out of old habits and try something different.

[i-05]


The Wrong Mistakes was realized in 2003 at the composer’s studio and premiered in October 2004 during the Tone Deaf Series at the Modern Fuel gallery in Kingston (Canada).

Premiere

  • October 7, 2004, Tone Deaf 3: Concert, Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre — Tett Centre, Kingston (Ontario, Canada)

Composition

Mastering

On Schedule

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2003
  • Duration: 12:22
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0728363812

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620130

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

On Schedule is part of a series of compositions called Pieces of Letters for 1 or 2 performers using computers. The pieces use the letters of the Latin alphabet and their arrangement on a computer keyboard as points of departure for organization and for performance instructions. In On Schedule the 26 letters of the alphabet and the number 1 key on the computer keyboard trigger 27 sound events that make up the piece. The 27 sound events derive harmonic and spectral content from the 27 scheduled train station stops on the route from London Waterloo in the United Kingdom to Moskva Byelorusski in Russia.

To create these sound events, the departure times for each station on the route were plotted on a line graph. The visual design of this line graph became the model for generating synthesized waveforms. The departure times were also used to determine pitches. A train sound was transposed to these pitches, as were the synthesized waveforms. The sounds generated were further processed using convolution, ring modulation, and the image synth function in Metasynth. Where pertinent, the shape of the line graph and departure times was employed in these procedures as well.

The result of this systematic processing of sounds provided materials for a piece that shifts gradually in pitch and timbre over 12 minutes to model the changes in mood, ambience, and consciousness that might occur over the 36 hours of a train journey. A single train recording taken from the World Soundscape Project Collection housed at the Sonic Studio, Simon Fraser University (Burnaby, Canada) was used throughout the piece.

[i-05]


On Schedule was realized in 2003 at the composer’s studio and premiered by DreamState (Scott MacGregor Moore, Jamie Todd) on December 16, 2003 as part of The Ambient Ping concert series at Club Nia in Toronto (Canada).

Premiere

  • December 16, 2003, DreamState (Scott MacGregor Moore, Jamie Todd), diffusion • The Ambient Ping, Club Nia, Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

Composition

Mastering

Early Signals

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2001
  • Duration: 4:27
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: CBC
  • ISWC: T0728363801

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620140

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

The voices of two radio pioneers Guglielmo Marconi and Peter Eckersly book-end Early Signals, a short historical portrait of early radio. Marconi and Eckersly reflect on their earliest achievements, and on what radio consisted of for them at the time of the early 1900’s as well as what they imagined it to be in the future. Filling out the portrait is an array of early radio noises, such as static, morse code, pops, and squiggles, as well as the great waves of the Atlantic ocean that Marconi’s wireless transmission crossed for the first time in history on December 12, 1901. These early signals are presented in their original forms in some cases and in others are manipulated electronically to heighten the tension and excitement identified with early innovative discoveries.

Marconi has been credited by most as the inventor of wireless telegraphy, which made it possible for ships to communicate to points on shore through Morse code transmitted via radio waves. A decade or so later it was possible to transmit the voice and music over radio waves and with that came pioneering leaps into radio broadcasting as we now know it. Eckersly had a hand in some of these early broadcast experiments in the United Kingdom and was one of the founders of the BBC. I felt that his playful musings and reflections about those early days were an appropriate ending to this short portrait of early broadcast history.

[i-05]


Early Signals was realized in 2001 at the composer’s studio and premiered on December 11, 2001. The piece was commissioned by CBC Radio One for its “Marconi Calling” program celebrating the 100th year since the first Trans-Atlantic transmission of a wireless signal — the letter s in Morse code — sent from Poldhu (Cornwall, UK) to Signal Hill (St John’s, Newfoundland). The voices of Marconi and Eckersly are taken from the archives of the Marconi Corporation.

Premiere

  • December 11, 2001, Marconi Calling, Radio One — CBC, Canada

Composition

Mastering

On a Strange Road

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 2003
  • Duration: 10:55
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0728363798

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620150

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

Sounds commonly associated with the road — a pop song on the radio, the weather, passing cars, the interior of a vehicle — are abstracted through electroacoustic processing in order to portray my inner roads traveled during long journeys as a vehicle passenger. The sound materials used in this composition were first used for my soundtrack created for The Hurricane Project, a play by Jennifer Fawcett premiered in February 2003 during the Rhubarb Festival at the Buddies in Bad Times Theatre in Toronto (Canada).

[i-05]


On a Strange Road was realized in 2003 at the composer’s studio and premiered in October 2004 during the Tone Deaf Series at the Modern Fuel gallery in Kingston (Canada).

Premiere

  • October 7, 2004, Tone Deaf 3: Concert, Modern Fuel Artist-Run Centre — Tett Centre, Kingston (Ontario, Canada)

Composition

Mastering

Faith-Annihia

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 1991
  • Duration: 8:55
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0728363787

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620160

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

Initially, I set out to create a sonic equivalent to the experimental film notion of ‘flicker’ where sound images could flash in and out of the stereo frame as fast as the eyes could blink. My hopes were that these aural images could represent snapshots of life that would meet each other in a virtual landscape comprised of various juxtapositions and superimpositions.

As the working process unfolded, and as musical questions over organization arose, other strategies and intentions began to preoccupy me. Out of necessity, I turned to crude chance operations (rolling dice, etc.) to streamline the task of ordering 75 discreet sound environments into the countless number of sound events that were required. To get an idea of the density, there are moments where up to 12 tracks are tightly compressed with events averaging less than a second in duration which is a lot when dealing with environmental sound sources rather than musical instruments. In the space of only 16 seconds, there could be some 200 sound events that crowd the stereo stage with industrial and environmental sounds.

When I reached the stage of listening to the first completed stereo sequences (averaging 16 seconds in length), I was struck by how much the sonic images had coalesced and fused into one single, undifferentiated whole. The sameness of one image to another was extremely surprising when compared to my original concept — the ‘flicker’ effect of rapid-fire images. Instead, the images seemed to group themselves and form a collective identity, desiring to part ways from individual paths of experiences and behaviours. Thus, the piece developed a tendency and character that was the opposite of my original intention.

The collision and fusion of these once disparate images formed the basis of a sonic landscape that was capable of evoking very grim, even apocalyptic, renderings of the urban soundscape. Instead of being like a fast ‘flicker’ sequence, the piece became a slow invasion of industrial sludge interrupted by prolonged moments of silence and immobility.

[i-05]


Faith-Annihia was realized in 1991 at the Electronic Music Studio of the School for Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada) and premiered on November 29, 1991 during the Sonic Boom Festival of BC Composers produced by Vancuver Pro Musica in Vancouver (Canada).

Premiere

  • November 29, 1991, Sonic Boom Festival of BC Composers, Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada)

Composition

Mastering

Always Becoming Somebody Else

Darren Copeland

  • Year of composition: 1991-92
  • Duration: 9:07
  • Instrumentation: fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0728363776

Stereo

ISRC CAD500620170

  • 48 kHz, 24 bits

In this piece I am trying to convey imaginary landscapes that are incomplete in their appearance and as a result are shrouded in dream-like ambiguity. In some instances, this results from foreground versus background arrangements that belong more to the category of collage than to a faithful representation of conventional experience. In other cases, this happens because settings are stripped of their distinguishing features in order to arrive at specific colour-fields.

Despite their fragmentation, the images spark pictures in the listening mind, as they construct a new ground of experience from which everyday logic vanishes temporarily. These new landscapes connect experiences and places that could never be joined in the physical world. The terrain thus freshly encountered, requires the listener to do some careful excavating and to study the loose fragments still partially decipherable. The capacity to articulate and understand the language of abstract and irrational images should enable him or her to cultivate sensitivity to the imaginative realm of conventional acoustic experience.

[i-05]


Always Becoming Somebody Else was realized in 1991-92 at the Electronic Music Studio of the School for Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada) and premiered in November 1993 by Vancouver New Music at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre. The piece received an honorable mention in the 1993 Vancouver New Music Young Composers Competition.

Premiere

  • November 1993, Vancouver New Music, The Cultch — Vancouver East Cultural Centre, Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada)

Awards

Composition

Mastering