Chroniques d’une séduction (CD) Track listing detail

Espresso espressivo

Jacques Tremblay

  • Year of composition: 2003-04
  • Duration: 12:30
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Réseaux des arts médiatiques, with support from the CALQ

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811810

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

This piece puts the coffee theme under pressure. From single bean to hot bowl, its aroma is enough to awaken the mind. Whether it be JS Bach profaning it through a sweet cantata or Gainsbourg eroticizing it with a sunburnt old song, the extract it produces is always cheerful.

In French, the word “café” is used for both coffee and an establishment where people meet and talk, where odd characters brush elbows with an affected Roland, thus becoming the perfect spot to experiment with otherness.

Long or strong, the espresso expresses the exhilaration of urban speed. And I would like to express my regards to the expressiveness of my espresso machine.

[English translation: François Couture, viii-08]


Espresso espressivo was realized in 2003-04 at the composer’s studio in Montréal, and premiered on February 11, 2004 during the Rien à voir (15) concert series presented by Réseaux at Espace GO in Montréal. This work was commissioned by Réseaux des arts médiatiques with support from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ).


Premiere

  • February 11, 2004, Rien à voir (15): Multiple Soundings, Espace Go, Montréal (Québec)

L’énigme anima

Jacques Tremblay

  • Year of composition: 1997, 2001
  • Duration: 9:22
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: ACREQ

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811820

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

There are two characters in this piece: Persona and Anima.

Persona is the external personality, here represented by guitar sounds. Anima illustrates the inner personality, consisting in the behaviour regarding the psychic process (facing the subconscious). Here, Anima is characterized by the expressive nature of a counter tenor’s voice.

CG Jung taught us that these two facets complement each other. The tragical play and opposition of the opposites existing between the inner self and the outer self actually provides the energy that drives any kind of vital process.

In a sense, this composition is an allegory on the intimate otherness that can come to life in every individual. Something like a quest on the bright side of the soul — finding the frontier any creator seeks in order to go back to one’s roots.

The anima is the other side of the self that urges you to continue, that invites you to reinvent subconscious chaos, this pool of gestating multiple possibles. The subconsciousness’s charm resides in the fact that it is endless.

Is it the anima that stimulates us and makes us evolve from our earliest childhood on? What is it that urges my seven-month-old son to try to stand up on his tiny feet, despite the fact that he may fall and hurt himself? Is he aware of the risk he is taking? Where is his drive to try new things every day coming from? Is the anima what pushes him to push back his limits, again and again?

At least, this lack of a definitive answer is what keeps on stimulating all the people who care to create and reinvent.

[English translation: François Couture, ix-08]


L’énigme anima [The Anima Enigma] was realized in 1997 at the composer’s studio and premiered (under the title Faux lot de flots) on May 1, 1997 during the concert “Haute tension” presented by ACREQ at Usine C in Montréal. This work was commissioned by ACREQ. The piece took its final title only after it was repaired and revised in 2001.


Premiere

  • May 1, 1997, Haute tension, Usine C, Montréal (Québec)

Empathies entropiques

Jacques Tremblay

  • Year of composition: 1998-2001
  • Duration: 47:08
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
To Yves Daoust, because of everything he taught me

This work is an inner odyssey of sorts, in praise of multiplicity. The piece features a series of snapshots, each illustrating a specific experience with otherness through characters with different cultural backgrounds.

I chose to use the human voice as the featured instrument. By capturing various languages (Russian, Italian, Creole, English, Arabic, African, made-up language), I was going for a feeling of strangeness. Since I don’t understand these languages, their meaning was not a burden anymore, and I could let myself be guided by their musical qualities.

A fragile hesitation, the rhythm set by sentences, a pause for breath, a burst of laughter — all these ephemeral anecdotes were awakening me to the other and making me thirsty for the slightest fluctuations. I had the feeling I was capturing fragments of souls, and discovering the inner reality of these emotions, a portion of universality.

At the heart of the creative process, as I was soaking in this energy, moments of listening became veritable opportunities to meet. The discovery of the other, of my critical look, of the intimate repercussions that emerged.

“This is the eternal origin of art: a shape appears to a man and demands to be fixed in a work. That shape is not the product of his soul, but an outside apparition that manifested itself to that soul and asked from it an efficient force. This is an essential action. If the man realizes himself, if he says, with all his might, the fundamental word I-You to the shape that appeared to him, then the efficient force flows, and the work is born.” [Translated by François Couture]

This quote is from a beautiful book by Martin Buber entitled Je et Tu (1938). This book, which marvelously describes a philosophy of the meeting, was a huge source of inspiration.

Was it madness to wish to translate into music the experience of reciprocity? To make a moment of intimacy almost tangible? Maybe it was, but it allowed me to experience a true inner journey to the heart of one of otherness’s beauties: the richness of differences.

[English translation: François Couture, viii-08]


Empathies entropiques [Entropic Empathies] was realized between 1998 and 2001 at the composer’s studio in Montréal, and premiered on December 12, 2001 at Espace GO in Montréal, during the Rien à voir (10) concert series presented by Réseaux. Thanks to Camille Locquet, Gisèle Poirier and her family, Sylvana Bitar, Jennyfer, Sergeï, Yvonne Robuste, Dominique de Juriew, Lolita, Pablo Bonacina, Lucie Lukina, Claude Jeannot, Eval Manigat, and Mano Charlemagne. And to the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec (CALQ).


Premiere

  • December 12, 2001, Rien à voir (10): concert solo: Altérité, Espace Go, Montréal (Québec)

Empathies entropiques, 1: La petite Camille

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 6:38

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811830

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 2: L’enfant d’Afrique

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 3:24

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811840

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 3: Ganga Is Divine

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 4:36

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811850

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 4: Lolita corps et âme

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 4:16

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811860

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 6: Tryptique russe

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 6:38

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811880

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 7: Rêve libanais

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 6:07

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811890

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Empathies entropiques, 8: Haïti troubadour

Jacques Tremblay

  • Duration: 8:32

Stereo

ISRC CAD500811900

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.