Allusions sonores (Download) Track listing detail

Buoy

David Berezan

  • Year of composition: 2011
  • Duration: 9:40
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501310006

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 32 bits

Buoy explores the soundworlds and environments of sea buoys, many of which have bells, gongs or whistles that sound in response to the motion of the sea. The diverse characteristics of buoys, used to aid sea navigation as well as scientific research of maritime weather, ecology and oceanography, inform the sonic language and grammar developed in the piece. Surges of materials phrased according to ocean wave action and underlying pulsating and droning pitched materials (alluding to the transmitted signals from buoys) create strong thematic threads through the work and provide a framework of navigation through real-world glimpses (waves and bells) and contrasting abstract soundworlds.

[viii-13]


Buoy was realized during periods of residency in the electroacoustic music studios at the Visby International Centre for Composers (VICC, Sweden) and EMS (Stockholm, Sweden), and premiered on March 19, 2011 during the concert Akusmatisk magi at the Kulturkiosken of the Institutet för Digitala Konstarter (IDKA) in Gävle (Sweden). Buoy was awarded the Prize in the Concurso Internacional de Composição Electroacústica Música Viva (Portugal, 2012).


Premiere

  • March 19, 2011, David Berezan, diffusion • Akusmatisk magi, IDKA Kulturkiosken, Gävle (Sweden)

Awards

Thumbs

David Berezan

  • Year of composition: 2011
  • Duration: 11:57
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501310007

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 32 bits

Thumbs uses a single plucked sound from a Balinese thumb piano as its primary sound source, subjected to transformations of pitch and grain, and explored in multichannel space. I aimed to reduce the variety of sound-types and materials used in the work as much as possible, while still creating an engaging and evolving soundworld. A number of spoken expressions that include ‘thumb’ came to mind during the composition of the piece (rule-of-thumb, all-thumbs, thumbing through, thumbs-up / down, under thumb). These acted, at some level, as informers upon the work.

[ix-13]


Thumbs was realized at the electroacoustic music studios of CMMAS in Morelia (Mexico), University of Calgary (Canada) and Université de Montréal (Québec), and premiered August 12, 2011 during the concert Places for our ears to go… during the Sound Travels Festival of Sound Art at Wychwood Theatre in Toronto (Canada).


Premiere

  • August 12, 2011, David Berezan, diffusion • Sound Travels 2011: Places for Our Ears to Go…, Wychwood Theatre — Artscape Wychwood Barns, Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

Badlands

David Berezan

  • Year of composition: 2008
  • Duration: 10:35
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-channel fixed medium
  • Commission: IMEB

Stereo

ISRC CAD501310008

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 32 bits

The Badlands of southern Alberta (Canada) comprise a vast and carved prairie landscape containing dinosaur fossils, intimate parks, indigenous peoples history and very unique climate. In the summer of 2007 I collected an array of sound materials in the region that allowed me to compose a work that directly references an area of the world that I will always think of as very near to ‘home.’ Long summer days, deep river valleys surrounded by grasslands that seem to stretch out forever, mountains on the horizon and warm evenings, camping by firelight and long shadows. In this respect, there is a sense of nostalgia in Badlands, but only to the point where my investigation of sound creates more otherworldly and densely constructed soundworlds.

[ii-13]


Badlands was realized in 2008 in the studios of the IMEB in Bourges (France) and was premiered on May 30, 2008 during the festival Synthèse at the Grand théâtre de la Maison de la culture à Bourges (France). Badlands was commissioned by IMEB.


Premiere

  • May 30, 2008, David Berezan, diffusion • Synthèse 2008: Concert, Grand théâtre — Maison de la culture de Bourges, Bourges (Cher, France)

Galungan

David Berezan

  • Year of composition: 2010
  • Duration: 10:24
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501310009

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 32 bits

Galungan uses sounds recorded in and around Ubud (Bali, Indonesia). Several visits I have made there since the early 1990s have acquainted me with a unique traditional culture (marked by daily ceremony and ritual as a part of everyday life) and a beautiful natural environment. Both of these also present a rich sonic tapestry: sounds from the rice paddies, sounds from the gamelan and sounds that weave their way through all aspects of life in the area. Many of the sounds used in the piece were recorded during and around the Galungan religious festival (featuring many impromptu musical events and gatherings). The work gravitates to the rice paddies and the ceremonies, and to day and night. These separated aspects are evident in the structure of the work, but are also united in the materials developed: the pulse of the natural night sounds and the rhythm of the ceremonies, and the resonances of the music, instruments and rituals.

[ii-13]


Galungan was realized at the Electroacoustic Music Studios at The University of Manchester (UK) and was premiered on October 8, 2010 during the festival Ai-maako at the Teatro Municipal Lord Cochrane in Valdivia (Chile).


Premiere

  • October 8, 2010, David Berezan, diffusion • Ai-maako 2010: Concert, Teatro Municipal Lord Cochrane, Valdivia (Chile)

Nijō

David Berezan

  • Year of composition: 2009
  • Duration: 12:57
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501310010

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 24 bits
  • 96 kHz, 32 bits

Nightingale floors (uguisubari, 鴬張り) are wooden floors found in several temples and palaces in Japan (including Nijō Castle in Kyoto) that are designed to make a squeaking or chirping sound when walked upon. This functions as a sort of security system, making it difficult for intruders to enter and pass through corridors undetected. For a composer that explores, collects and ‘uncovers’ sounds as part of the creative process, this is a compelling concept both literally (sonically) and metaphorically. Developing further the idea that underneath and within the floorboards reside nightingales, Nijō delves deeper into, and within, the floorboards, revealing not only birds but many voices and soundworlds of traditional and contemporary Japan.

[ii-13]


Sound recordings for Nijō were completed during a period of research residency in 2007 with the kind support of Tamagawa University in Tokyo (Japan), and the work was realized in 2009 in the Electroacoustic Music Studios at The University of Manchester (UK). Nijō was premiered October 30, 2009 during the MANTIS Festival at the Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall of the Martin Harris Centre of The University of Manchester (UK).


Premiere

  • October 30, 2009, David Berezan, diffusion • MANTIS Fall Festival 2009: Concert, Cosmo Rodewald Concert Hall — Martin Harris Centre for Music and Drama — The University of Manchester, Manchester (England, UK)

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.