Fluides (CD) Track listing detail

Mécanique des fluides

Horacio Vaggione

  • Year of composition: 2014-15
  • Duration: 19:17
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium
  • Commission: French State (Music Office), Ina-GRM

Stereo

ISRC CAD501710095

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

The title Mécanique des fluides [Fluid Mechanics] can be taken poetically, metaphorically, or more scientifically as alluding to a certain description of the physical world. My composition uses all three meanings of the phrase at once. The difference I often make between laminar (smooth) sounds and turbulent (intermittent) sounds is underpinned by a physical description. I think that sounds – all sounds – behave like fluids. However, despite the fact that I am taking this phenomenology into account, I am not looking to “imitate” some form of “nature,” but trying to let composed sound morphologies emerge, as manifested in levels of polyphonic activity.

[English translation: François Couture, ix-17]


Mécanique des fluides was realized in 2014-15 in the studios of the Groupe de recherches musicales (GRM) in Paris (France) and premiered on January 23, 2015, as part of the Multiphonies series presented by the Ina-GRM at the Auditorium Saint-Germain of the MPAA (Paris, France). The piece was commissioned by the French State (Music Office) and the Ina-GRM (Paris).


Premiere

  • January 23, 2015, Multiphonies 2014-15: Akousma, Auditorium Saint-Germain — MPAA, Paris (France)

[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

This stereophonic recording was finalized at the composer’s studio in August 2017.

PianoHertz

Horacio Vaggione

  • Year of composition: 2012
  • Duration: 18:29
  • Instrumentation: multichannel fixed medium (Klangdom, 46-track)
  • Commission: ZKM

Stereo

ISRC CAD501710096

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

I made PianoHertz from a collection of short sounds that I played on a piano myself. I recorded these sounds with the intention to extend them digitally to foster the birth of multiple classes, some retaining morphological and dynamic traits of the original sounds while others represent radical mutations.

So what I have created here is an “acousmatic consort” of 46 real tracks, where piano sounds outgrow their usual acoustic behaviour, projected that they are over their own causes, remote from their natural radiation. The goal here is not to imitate/degrade a noble acoustic instrument, but to bring positive ontological change (toward electroacoustics).

The transformational network used includes granulations, aggregations, and algorithmic and manual micro-editing. All the source material has gone, either upstream or downstream, through a “prismatic” convolution process, a digital technique where morphological attributes are increased. New objects are created by strong interactions between these attributes, interactions that depend on the nature of these morphologies and on the initial time points of each “coupling” (this occurs in the domain of micro-time, although the consequences can be felt through all possible time scales).

[English translation: François Couture, ix-17]


PianoHertz was realized in 2012 in the studios of the Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe (ZKM) in Germany and premiered on November 24, 2012, under the title Consort for Convolved Piano Sounds as part of the festival Imatronic Extended 2012 at the ZKM_Kubus of the ZKM. Afterwards the work was known as Consort for Convolved Pianos until July 2017 when it took its definitive title PianoHertz. The piece was commissioned by the ZKM.


Premiere

  • November 24, 2012, Under the title Consort for Convolved Piano Sounds: Imatronic Extended 2012: Giga-Hertz-Prize 2012, Walter-Fink Prize, ZKM_Kubus, Karlsruhe (Germany)

[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

This stereophonic recording was finalized at the composer’s studio in August 2017.

Consort for Convolved Violins

Horacio Vaggione

  • Year of composition: 2011
  • Duration: 7:12
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501710097

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits
To Max Mathews, in memoriam

Consort for Convolved Violins is dedicated to Max Mathews, pioneer of computer-assisted sound synthesis, who passed away in 2011. He also loved the violin.

This “consort” is the result of the application of digital convolution techniques to objects taken from the sonic world of the violin. Three musicians are playing figures from a score written especially for this project. The sounds they make are captured by a microphone and digitized. Nowadays we have techniques that make it possible to produce convolutions in real-time, but working in delayed time allows a higher level of precision – to a few milliseconds – in how sound materials are tied together. This explains why Consort for Convolved Violins is an acousmatic piece realized in the studio with an approach later used for PianoHertz (it is actually an ancestor of the latter).

[English translation: François Couture, ix-17]


Consort for Convolved Violins was realized in 2011 at the studios of the Centre de recherche informatique et création musicale (CICM) of the Université Paris 8 (France) and premiered on May 8, 2012, during the Écologie des sons festival in the Amphithéâtre X of the Université Paris 8 (France). Source-violins: Wen Chen, David Brown, Manfred Kraemer.


Premiere

  • May 8, 2012, Festival Écologie des sons, Amphi X — Université Paris 8, Saint-Denis (Seine-Saint-Denis, France)

[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

This recording was finalized at the composer’s studio in August 2017.

Préludes suspendus III

Horacio Vaggione

  • Year of composition: 2009, 10
  • Duration: 8:48
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: French State (Music Office)

Stereo

ISRC CAD501710098

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

The Préludes suspendus [Suspended Preludes] series stretched over a decade. It is based on the notion of testing interactions between composed sound materials that provide a common palette for all the pieces in the series. Hence the name “preludes,” and hence their “suspension.” In fact, some of the sound materials found on this palette have been used outside this series, namely in Mécanique des fluides and PianoHertz, though in such cases they are transformed into and by new contexts, blended with different materials, or used as impulsions in various sets of convolutions.

Préludes suspendus III consists in a fabric of figures that unfolds like a set of perspectives articulated between things “near” and “far,” and, again, between things laminar and turbulent. This piece is like a polyphonic journey on multiple scales, a journey listeners can recompose with each listen by focusing on different levels.

[English translation: François Couture, ix-17]


Préludes suspendus III [Suspended Preludes III] was realized in 2009 — and revised in 2010 — in the studios of the Institut international de musique électroacoustique de Bourges (IMEB, France) and premiered on June 6, 2009, during the Synthèse festival at Palais Jacques-Cœur in Bourges. The piece was commissioned by the French State (Music Office). Préludes suspendus III was awarded the Prix Ton Bruynèl 2010 (ex æquo) (Amsterdam, The Netherlands).


Premiere

  • June 6, 2009, Synthèse 2009: Concert, Palais Jacques-Cœur, Bourges (Cher, France)

Awards


[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

This recording was finalized at the composer’s studio in August 2017.

Fractal C

Horacio Vaggione

  • Year of composition: 1983-84
  • Duration: 10:35
  • Instrumentation: 16-channel fixed medium
  • Commission: French State (Music Office)

Stereo

ISRC CAD501710099

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

This trembling piece is both continuous and fragmented. It was realized on a VAX 780, a type of mainframe computer now extinct. The lines of code written for it – in Cmusic language – have no operational purpose anymore. The music is all that remains.

The title Fractal C derives from the fact that I used, as a generative module, a fractal model called the triadic Cantor set, an infinite iterative process from a straight line amputated of its middle third. This model was not applied linearly; on the contrary, it was projected on a wide range of temporal scales.

Making this piece showed me the potential held by a granular approach – or “granular sensibility” – in which I was already delving well before this piece and which I continued to develop afterward with other means.

[English translation: François Couture, ix-17]


Fractal C was realized in 1983-84 in the studios of the Institut de recherche et coordination acoustique/musique (IRCAM) in Paris (France) and premiered on June 12, 1984, in the Espace de projection of IRCAM. The piece was commissioned by the French State (Music Office).


Premiere

  • June 12, 1984, Concert, Espace de projection — Ircam, Paris (France)

[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

This stereophonic recording was finalized at the composer’s studio in August 2017.

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.