Ténébrisme (CD) Track listing detail

Ctrl c

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2016
  • Duration: 10:59
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Ben Gaunt

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810030

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

In 2016, I was asked by Ben Gaunt to produce an acousmatic re-mix of his existing instrumental piece 16th Century Horror, for flute, oboe, and piano, and was provided with pristine recordings of the work’s three movements along with stem recordings of the individual instruments.

I began by lightly processing and developing these recordings in ways that would maintain clear and unambiguous references to Gaunt’s original piece. In this way, I hoped to remain true to the idea of a remix. As I worked, however, I increasingly found myself nudging materials in directions that I wanted to explore, and this started to force a separation between Gaunt’s music and my own. As I struggled on, the constant nudging gave way to more extreme acts — pushing and pulling, bending and breaking — until all references to 16th Century Horror were, unfortunately, severed. A few, brief hints of the instrumental origins lurk throughout, but ultimately there is little that connects Ctrl c with Gaunt’s work. As is often the case, things apparently ‘copied’ are all-too-often unique.

[vi-18]


Ctrl c was realized in 2016 at the composer’s studio in Sheffield (UK) and premiered on April 7, 2016 during the Instrumental vs Electroacoustic: Remixing Contemporary Classical Music conference produced by the Institute of Musical Research at The University of Sheffield (UK). The piece was commissioned by Ben Gaunt, who proposed the idea of a remix and kindly offered up his work to make this a possibility, with support from the Institute of Musical Research (UK). Ctrl c was awarded a Nomination at the 9th Destellos Electroacoustic Composition Competition (Mar del Plata, Argentina, 2016).


Premiere

  • April 7, 2016, Instrumental vs Electroacoustic: Remixing Contemporary Classical Music, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (England, UK)

Awards

Metallurgic

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2015
  • Duration: 8:16
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810031

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

In early 2015, I was extremely frustrated by an increasingly prominent ‘trope’ that appeared to have emerged (and arguably still exists) within the field of electroacoustic music; the form of certain works appeared to rest on little more than the mere presentation of dissimilarity between two sets of materials and their subsequent tussle for dominance. Metallurgic set out to parody this trope.

I started by recording a wide range of metallic objects — in my mind, the sound of metallic objects had become an electroacoustic standard —, and I set about exploring my recorded materials with little concern for the inevitable clichés that would result. A sustained pitched sound was ultimately contrasted with various noise-based granular materials, thus establishing the kind of binary contrast similar to that which I was attempting to parody. To my surprise, it was extremely difficult, and enjoyable, to work with this binary.

The act of composition was every bit as complex and fascinating as my experience of composition more generally, and I completed the piece having developed a genuine and long-lasting respect for the very trope that I had set out to parody. The title of this work is as close to an electroacoustic ‘standard’ as I could muster.

[vi-18]


Metallurgic was realized in 2015 at the composer’s studio in Sheffield (UK) and premiered on November 1, 2015 in the Large Concert Hall of the Ural Mussorgsky State Conservatoire as part of the >SYNC.2015 festival in Yekaterinburg (Russia). Metallurgic was awarded the 2nd Prize ex æquo at the >SYNC.2015 International Competition of Electroacoustic Music and Multimedia (Yekaterinburg, Russia, 2015).


Premiere

  • November 1, 2015, >SYNC.2015: Concert, Ural Mussorgsky State Conservatoire – Large Concert Hall, Yekaterinburg (Russia)

Awards

Inam

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2016
  • Duration: 10:58
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810032

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

I am constantly fascinated by the sheer number of creative paths and avenues that open up during the act of composition. One cannot follow them all, however, and many remain unexplored. Occasionally, they are worth revisiting. For example, the distorted, guitar-like event at the start of Metallurgic (2015) remained unexplored until I composed Inam. Here, I follow the many paths and avenues that Metallurgic didn’t allow, resulting in an exploration of pitch, noise, distortion, rhythm and power.

[vi-18]


Inam was realized in 2016 at the composer’s studio in Sheffield (UK) and premiered on October 20, 2016 during the concert Sounds Eclectic as part of the Akousma 13 festival presented by Réseaux des arts médiatiques at Usine C (Montréal, Québec). Inam was a finalist at the Musica Nova 2016 International Competition of Electroacoustic Music (Prague, Czech Republic).


Premiere

  • October 20, 2016, Akousma 13: Sounds Eclectic, Usine C, Montréal (Québec)

Awards

Inja

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2017
  • Duration: 10:16
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810033

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

In 2016, my wife and I completed a residency at the Centro Mexicano para la Música y las Artes Sonoras (CMMAS). During this time, we started to explore ways in which a melodic theme, initially performed on the piano, might be transformed using electroacoustic resources to produce series of variations. This piece takes one of these themes, initially created at CMMAS, and presents three new variations, interspersed with two noise-based interludes. In doing so, it offers an unambiguous exploration of theme and variation, and thus associates the formal arrangement of materials with music of past eras.

[vi-18]


Inja was realized in 2017 at the composer’s studio in Sheffield (UK) and premiered on September 22, 2017 during a concert at the University of Greenwich in London (UK).


Premiere

  • September 22, 2017, Loudspeaker Orchestra Concert Series: Adam Stanović, University of Greenwich, London (England, UK)

Foundry Flux

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2015
  • Duration: 12:13
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Sheaf Prospect

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810034

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

The small patch of land bordering Doncaster Street, Sheffield (UK), has witnessed a remarkable period of transformation. Once home to an 18th-century foundry, it was located in the industrial heart of the city, nestling alongside some 250 cementation furnaces employed in the production of blister steel. At that time, the imposing cementation furnace (which still towers over the plot) was a characteristic feature of the industrial landscape, and an emblem of Sheffield’s manufacturing prowess. Although the furnace continued to produce steel throughout the Second World War, operations ceased in 1951. It now stands alone in the Sheffield skyline, a symbol of industrial decline. For a time, the land lay abandoned and forgotten, becoming little more than a post-industrial wasteland at the edge of the city centre. In recent years, this decline has been overturned; the overgrown, idle patch of land has been transformed into a community space, which invites artistic activities and projects, serving to reconnect the land with the city of Sheffield. In this context, the newly named Furnace Park seems appropriate; it connects the land of the past with that of the present and, hopefully, future.

This piece, Foundry Flux, attempts to do something similar; although flux refers to a flowing or purifying agent used in the production of steel, the term is employed here to capture the flowing, changing state of the land itself. Traffic, which circles the patch of land, was recorded and used to generate the entire work. Processing of these recordings serves to imagine the blistering heat of the furnace, before transforming the space into a hub of creative practice.

[vi-18]


Foundry Flux was realized in 2015 at The University of Sheffield Sound Studios (USSS) (UK) and premiered on June 24, 2015 during the EMS 15 — The Art of Electroacoustic Music conference in Sheffield. The piece was commissioned by Sheaf Prospect: Soundscaping Furnace Park. Thanks to Amanda Crawley Jackson, who created the project and directs the park, and Chris Bevan, who made the recordings of traffic as part of the Sheaf Prospect project. Foundry Flux was awarded 2nd prize at the 11th Destellos Electroacoustic Composition Competition (Mar del Plata, Argentina, 2018), and was awarded a Mention in the Concurso Internacional de Composição Electroacústica Música Viva (Portugal, 2016).


Premiere

  • June 24, 2015, Adam Stanović, diffusion • EMS 15 — The Art of Electroacoustic Music: Concert 2, Drama Studio — The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (England, UK)

Awards

Would be to Seek

Adam Stanović

  • Year of composition: 2017
  • Duration: 9:49
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501810035

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

An homage to Beatriz Ferreyra on the occasion of her 80th birthday.

[vi-18]


Would be to Seek was realized in 2017 at the composer’s studio in Sheffield (UK) and premiered on September 22, 2017 during a concert at the University of Greenwich in London (UK). The piece was requested by Annette Vande Gorne, who very kindly coordinated the birthday gift for Beatriz Ferreyra. Would be to Seek received an Honorable mention at the 15th Musicacoustica-Beijing competition (China, 2018).


Premiere

  • September 22, 2017, Loudspeaker Orchestra Concert Series: Adam Stanović, University of Greenwich, London (England, UK)

Awards

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.