Micro-lieux (Download) Track listing detail

Topophilia

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2016
  • Duration: 8:23
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910027

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

The concept of topophilia relates to attraction or affinity to place, the bond between a person and a specific locality. Topophilia is understood to be the result of the perception of a particular environment. In this case the term is borrowed to suggest the allure of a type of place — a space instilled with musical meaning — which displays characteristics of intimacy and closeness. An abstract musical topos, which exists in the intimate and personal zones and is rooted in the concrete materiality of the sound objects inhabiting it. The work is not only an artistic interpretation of the notion of aural micro-space but also an attempt to work with the reality of such a notion in a way that the latter permeates the former.

[ii-19]


Topophilia was realized at the composer’s studio in the first half of 2016 and was premiered on October 8, 2016 during the Visiones Sonoras festival in Morelia (Mexico). Topophilia was awarded the 1st prize at the Iannis Xenakis International Electroacoustic Composition Competition (Thessaloniki, Greece, 2017), the 1st prize in the acousmatic category at the 9th Destellos Electroacoustic Composition Competition (Mar del Plata, Argentina, 2016), the Prize of the electronic music category at the USF New-Music Consortium Competition (Tampa, FL, USA, 2017), the ICST Residency Prize at the Concours international de composition électroacoustique de Monaco (2016), the 2nd prize at the Klang! competition (Montpellier, France, 2017), and a special mention at the 9th Biennial Acousmatic Composition Competition Métamorphoses (Belgium, 2016).


Premiere

  • October 8, 2016, Visiones Sonoras 12 — 2016, International Conference of Electroacoustic CIME / ICEM 2016: Concierto CIME 2, Escuela Nacional de Estudios Superiores — UNAM Campus Morelia, Morelia (Mexico)

Awards

Karst Grotto

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2017
  • Duration: 7:50
  • Instrumentation: Ambisonics multichannel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910028

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 32 bits

The title Karst Grotto — chosen for its onomatopoeic qualities and its direct references to landscape types, as well as geological spatial structures and processes — reflects the sound world of the work. Karst, a particular topography, is created by the dissolution of soluble rock types from their contact with acidic rain water. A microlevel chemical process characterizes the morphology of entire landscapes and results in complex networks of small-scale — micro-space — features and textures like fissures and rillenkarrens.

[iii-19]


Karst Grotto was realized at the studios of the Department of Music Technology and Acoustics Engineering of the Technological Educational Institute of Crete (Greece) and the Institute for Computer Music and Sound Technology (ICST) of the Zürcher Hochschule der Künste (ZHdK) in Zurich (Switzerland), between July 2016 and January 2017, and was premiered on November 4, 2017 during the Sound Junction concert series in Sheffield (UK). Many thanks to Johannes Schütt for his guidance and support. Karst Grotto was awarded the 2nd prize in the electronic music category at Computer Space (Sofia, Bulgaria, 2018) and a Special Mention at the 10th Biennial Acousmatic Composition Competition Métamorphoses (Belgium, 2018).


Premiere

  • November 4, 2017, Sound Junction Autumn 2017: Nikos Stavropoulos, Firth Hall — The University of Sheffield, Sheffield (England, UK)

Awards

Granicus

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2016
  • Duration: 6:44
  • Instrumentation: percussion and stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Alexander Pepelasis

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910029

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

Granicus is the archaic name of a small river in northwestern Asia Minor, which was the site of Alexander the Great’s first major military challenge. The name is also used for one of Mars’ great valleys. The rhythms of antiquity, through tradition, inspire here the coming together of different worlds in space and time.

The work is based on dance rhythms used in Southeast Europe and Asia Minor. These rhythms are used unconventionally, presented against each other as well as treated using techniques like inversion, time expansion / contraction, substitution and additive processes. The resulting score has been used as the basis for a tape part. A recording of the score has been processed to create third order gestural surrogacy sound materials which display aural intimacy and are used as an extension of the live performance. The result displays the characteristics of “prepared” percussion movement in micro-space.

[iii-19]


Granicus was realized at the composer’s studio in 2016 and was premiered by Alexander Pepelasis on March 11, 2016 at the International Festival for Innovations in Music Production and Composition (iFIMPaC) at The Venue in Leeds (UK). The work was commissioned by Alexander Pepelasis.


Premiere

  • March 11, 2016, IFAI 2016: Concert, Leeds (England, UK)

[section.bq_piste.bq_enreg]

The present recording of the instrumental part performed by Alexander Pepelasis took place in 2016 in The Venue in Leeds (UK) (Michael Calley, sound engineer).

Ballistichory

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2015
  • Duration: 7:13
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910030

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 48 kHz, 24 bits
  • 48 kHz, 32 bits

The title of the work, Ballistichory, refers to a mode of seed dispersal. Fracturing of the seed pod releases stored elastic energy into kinetic energy launching its contents. The term reflects musical processes as well as timbral qualities of the work. Spore scattering, energy accumulation and release, are the reoccurring motifs which drive the narrative here.

[ii-19]


Ballistichory was realized at the composer’s studio at the end of 2014 and was premiered during the concert Electronic Geographies 2 presented by Miso Music Portugal on March 28, 2015 at the O’culto da Ajuda in Lisbon (Portugal). The work was awarded the 1st prize at the Open Circuit competition (Liverpool, UK, 2016), an Honorable Mention at the acousmatic category at the 8th Destellos Electroacoustic Composition Competition (Mar del Plata, Argentina, 2015), and was a finalist in the Klang! competition (Montpellier, France, 2015).


Premiere

  • March 28, 2015, Electronic Geographies 2, O’culto da Ajuda, Lisbon (Portugal)

Awards

Nyctinasty

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2009
  • Duration: 10:09
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910031

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 32 bits

Nyctinasty is concerned with organic movement, growth or reduction, as reaction to stimulus. Stimuli are either present in the sonic world of the work or implied. The title, borrowed from botany, refers to nastic (non-directional responses to stimuli) movement in the dark.

[ii-19]


Nyctinasty was realized at the composer’s studio in the summer of 2009 and was premiered on March 19, 2010 during the 13th international festival of electroacoustic music Primavera en La Habana in the Teatro of the Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Cuba in Havana (Cuba). Nyctinasty was awarded the Absoluta Prize at the 1st Punto de Encuentro Canarias International Contest of Electroacoustic Composition (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, 2009).


Premiere

  • March 19, 2010, Primavera en La Habana 2010: Concert, Teatro — Edificio de Arte Cubano — Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de Cuba, Havana (Cuba)

Awards

Atropos

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2003
  • Duration: 10:58
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910032

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 32 bits

In Greek mythology, Atropos was one of the three Moirae (Fates): female deities who supervised fate rather than determining it. Atropos was the fate who cut the thread or web of life. She was known as the ‘inflexible’ or ‘inevitable’ and cut this thread with the ‘abhorred shears.’ Although the title is not directly related to the content of the work, it was chosen to reflect compositional processes. Structural relationships are directed by the intrinsic morphology of the sounds employed here. In this respect, the choice of a Moira name metaphorically indicates the acousmatic processes involved in the work’s composition.

[iii-19]


Atropos was realized at the studios of The University of Sheffield (England, UK) in early 2003 and was premiered on December 5, 2003 during the Spatial Awareness concert series produced by BEAST at the CBSO Centre in Birmingham (England, UK). Atropos was awarded a mention in the Concurso Internacional de Composição Electroacústica Música Viva (Portugal, 2004).


Awards

Granatum

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2011
  • Duration: 8:05
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910033

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 32 bits

The title of the work, Granatum, is a reference to the nature of sound materials employed here. Punica granatum: the seeded apple or pomegranate, a symbol of fertility, abundance, and rebirth.

[iii-19]


Granatum was realized at the composer’s studio in the fall of 2011 and was premiered on April 27, 2012 at the International Festival for Innovations in Music Production and Composition (iFIMPaC) in Leeds (England, UK).


Premiere

  • April 27, 2012, iFIMPaC — Spring 2012: Concert, Leeds (England, UK)

Polychoron

Nikos Stavropoulos

  • Year of composition: 2007
  • Duration: 9:21
  • Instrumentation: 5.1-channel fixed medium

Stereo

ISRC CAD501910034

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits
  • 44,1 kHz, 32 bits
To James Mooney

From the Greek roots poly, meaning many, and choros, meaning room or space.

In geometry, a polychoron is a four-dimensional shape. It is described as a closed figure which is composed of elements of lower dimensions: vertices edges, faces, and cells. In the work, these elements frame the action of characters which display more organic features and often their transformation is the result or instigation of those actions.

[ii-19]


Polychoron was realized at the studios of the Culture Lab at Newcastle University (UK) in the summer of 2007 and was premiered on February 8, 2008 during the Concert 12 of the ÉuCuE 26th Concert Series in the Salle de concert Oscar-Peterson of Concordia University in Montréal (Québec).


Premiere

  • February 8, 2008, Series 26 — Concert 12, Salle de concert Oscar-Peterson — Université Concordia, Montréal (Québec)

By continuing browsing our site, you agree to the use of cookies, which allow audience analytics.