electrocd

Track listing detail

Suite baroque, 1: Toccata

Yves Daoust

  • Duration: 5:39
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0715175384

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110006

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

From the preface of the Premier livre des toccatas (1615) by Girolamo Frescobaldi.

[ix-91]


Composition

Petite musique sentimentale

Yves Daoust

  • Year of composition: 1984
  • Duration: 10:11
  • Instrumentation: piano and stereo fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: Harry Halbreich
  • ISWC: T0708479519

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110007

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Street traffic, radio traffic reports, weather forecasts. Winter ambiance in Montréal. Everyday sounds, from urban banality which are sporadically confronted — during a pause in the urban rumble — by a chord on the piano, as if it had escaped though a half-opened window. Nostalgic color, a little too sweet, that seems to come from elsewhere, from another era, another city.

[ix-91]


Petite musique sentimentale [Miniature Sentimental Music] was realized at the composer’s studio in 1984 and premiered by the pianist Anne Berteletti on January 20, 1985, at the Studio 106 of Radio France in Paris. This piece was commissioned by Belgium National Radio´s producer Harry Halbreich.

Premiere

  • January 20, 1985, Anne Berteletti, piano • Perspectives du XXe siècle: Carte blanche à Harry Halbreich, Studio 106 Sacha Guitry — Maison de Radio France, Paris (France)

Composition

About this recording

This version of Petite musique sentimentale was performed by Jacques Drouin, recorded at the McGill University Recording Studio in May 1991 (engineer: Peter Cook), and mixed at the composer’s studio in June 1991.

Recording

Mixing

Scores

Suite baroque, 2: «Qu’ai-je entendu?»

Yves Daoust

  • Duration: 2:29
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0704946031

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110008

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

From the opera Castor et Polux (1737) by Jean-Philippe Rameau.

[ix-91]


Composition

Adagio

Yves Daoust

  • Year of composition: 1986
  • Duration: 14:34
  • Instrumentation: flute and stereo fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: Lise Daoust, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0707501118

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110009

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

The modern flute of Boehm has incited an extremely virtuosic repertoire: theatrical works with superficial musical content, special effects cataloging the instrument’s idiosyncrasies and technical possibilities, pastiches of famous romantic violin concerti. It is certainly an outdated repertoire, but remains very flattering for the performer.

The instrumental part of Adagio was realized from 192 excerpts of virtuoso works well-known to any flutist (Boehm, Kuhlau, Tulou, Molique, Doppler, Fauré…). These excerpts are interspersed with quotations from the adagio of Mozart’s Quartet K 285 for flute, violin, viola and violoncello. Omnipresent both in the instrumental part and on the tape, Mozart’s adagio is intermingled with sounds of daily life: traffic, telephone ringing, a cultural radio program (in which Lise Daoust, the performer, is interviewed), television, music lessons.

The writing is fragmented, and continually interrupted. The performer desperately tries to bring together all of the strewn pieces, to match them into a coherent discourse.

Her imaginary pianist (in the concert version, a piano is placed near the flutist) serves as an anchor to reality. But she rapidly diverts.

[ix-91]


Adagio was realized at the composer’s studio in 1985-86 and premiered by the flutist Lise Daoust on April 19, 1987, at the festival Musiques actuelles Nice/Côte d’Azur (MANCA, France). This piece was commissioned by Lise Daoust and realized with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA).

Premiere

  • April 19, 1987, Lise Daoust, flute • Festival Manca 1987: Concert, Nice (Alpes-Maritimes, France)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at the Conservatoire de musique de Montréal in June, 1991 and mixed at the composer’s studio.

Recording

Mixing

Scores

Suite baroque, 3: Les «Agrémens»

Yves Daoust

  • Duration: 6:47
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0704765296

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110010

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

From an excerpt of L’art de toucher le clavecin (1717) by François Couperin.

[ix-91]


Composition

L’Entrevue

Yves Daoust

  • Year of composition: 1991
  • Duration: 9:11
  • Instrumentation: accordion and stereo fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: Joseph Petric, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0704775256

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110011

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Fourth in the solo performer and tape cycle, L’Entrevue (The Interview) expands the same theme of solitude. As opposed to the three preceding works where the musician is isolated on stage with a fairly aggressive tape surrounding him with sounds from daily life — various machines, ‘communication’ devices, industrial music — in L’Entrevue, the performer is facing himself: in an intimate approach, the tape is constructed exclusively from the speaking voice of the performer (Joseph Petric). The instrumental part is a mixture of quotes from the English Suite for harpsichord by JS Bach, and of stereotypical melodic and rhythmical phrases taken from the traditional accordion repertoire.

Adopting the form and shape of an interview, the piece explores the timbre and intonation of the speaking voice rather than its content. The recorded voice is punctuated by occasional sounds from the accordion recorded on tape or performed by the musician on stage, acting as a moan, a sigh, a burst of anger, an attempted flight of lyricism or nostalgia, all underlining the dramatic character of the moment, like an anamorphic mirror reflecting the unappeased aspirations of the passionate musician, in search of the absolute, prisoner of an instrument which is closer to a music box than a majestic organ…

[ix-91]


L’Entrevue was realized at the composer’s studio in 1991 and premiered by the accordionist Joseph Petric on April 24, 1991, during a recital produced by ACREQ at the Théâtre Les Loges in Montréal. This piece was commissioned by Joseph Petric and realized with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA).

Premiere

  • April 24, 1991, Joseph Petric, accordion • Concert, Théâtre Les Loges, Montréal (Québec)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded and mixed at the composer’s studio in April and May, 1991.

Recording

Mixing

Suite baroque, 4: L’Extase

Yves Daoust

  • Duration: 4:17
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0704946984

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110012

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Love scene between the harpsichordist and her instrument.

[ix-91]


Composition

Quatuor

Yves Daoust

  • Year of composition: 1979
  • Duration: 18:43
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T0704768400

Stereo

ISRC CAD509110013

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Here the approach is more ‘classical’: the sound sources, although instrumental, are used as objects reshaped with the traditional transformation techniques of the analog studio. The reference to the instrumental nature of the sounds and to the string quartet remains very strong: it is at the source of the process.

During the composition of this piece I was thinking of Beethoven’s Große Fuge, Opus 133, especially of its unbelievable — almost inhuman — tension, as if Beethoven had wanted to make the instrument explode, wanted to reach the limit beyond which reside zones of expression inaccessible to acoustic instruments — other than in dreams — but that the magic and artifices of electroacoustic means now allow us to explore.

Searching for the inflections and articulations characteristic of string quartet writing throughout time, pushing them a little to enter into an imaginary space, transcending the physical limits of the musicians tied to their acoustic instruments remain the objectives of Quatuor (Quartet), intended as an hommage to those performers for whom the formation of a quartet is a little like entering into a religion…

[ix-91]


Since its premiere, Quatuor has known many different versions and forms of presentation. First, it was realized as the soundtrack for the animation film L’âge de chaise (The Age of the Chair), directed by Jean-Thomas Bédard at the National Film Board of Canada (NFB). It was then reworked at the Atelier sonore de l’ONF (‘NFB Sound Shop’) as an autonomous electroacoustic piece. In its concert format, the work premiered in April, 1979, at the Conventum in Montréal in a concert produced by ACREQ. It was then presented along with a multi-image projection realized by photographer Jean-Guy Thibodeau. Quatuor was awarded the 1st Prize in the Electroacoustic Category of the 8th Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition (France, 1980) and the 1980 CIME Grand Prize, and was first released on the Cultures électroniques 1 compact disc produced by the Groupe de musique expérimentale de Bourges (GMEB) on the Le chant du monde label (LDC 278043).

Premiere

  • April 8, 1979, Concert, Centre d’essai Le Conventum, Montréal (Québec)

Awards

Composition

  • 1979