electrocd

Track listing detail

La Fiesta

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1989
  • Duration: 9:52
  • Instrumentation: keyboard-controlled synthesizers (Yamaha DX-7IID/E!, Yamaha TX-802) and stereo fixed medium
  • ISWC: T0708471037

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612030

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

La Fiesta (The Party) was conceived as a symphony of sound color forms derived from the telluric experiences of my tropical ear. The piece involves two sets of Yamaha DX-7IID(E!) and TX-802 synthesizers, one set to be performed live, the other recorded on tape. The result is a multitudinous web of synthetic sound designs having vocal, instrumental or electronic quality which are orgiastically combined between solo and tape to achieve the desired expressive idea.


La Fiesta was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in September, 1989 for the Rendezvous Festival in London (UK) with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA). It premiered in October, 1989 by myself at the South Bank Centre (London) and has since been performed and recorded in Canada, USA and Europe. La Fiesta was recorded on the Anthology of Canadian Music: Electroacoustic music by Radio Canada International (ACM 37) released in 1990. La Fiesta was awarded at the International Music Council (IMC) International Rostrum of Electroacoustic Music (IREM) (Oslo, Norway, 1990). La Fiesta was extremely difficult to create; I owe to Barbara all the encouragement to survive it. She switched me from the tracks of torture to those of magic.

Premiere

  • October 1989, Sergio Barroso, keyboard • Concert, Southbank Centre, London (England, UK)

Awards

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in January and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire.

Recording

Crónicas de Ultrasueño

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1992
  • Duration: 12:51
  • Instrumentation: oboe and keyboard-controlled synthesizers
  • Commission: León Biriotti, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0710375737

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612040

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Crónicas de Ultrasueño (Chronicles from Beyond Dreams) was inspired by the poetic musicality, unreality, and polylyricism of the unique Catalan and major Hispanic writer JV Foix (1894-1987). The title was borrowed from his last work Croniques de l’ultrason (1985). Scored for solo oboe and keyboard controlled FM synthesizers, the piece was conceived in three uninterrupted sections that seek to bind together with a strong introspective flavor such opposites as concrete and abstract, old and new, reality and unreality. A demanding oboe part interplays with the polymicrotonal sound colors of the live electronics along a linear path of increasingly complex drama.


Crónicas de Ultrasueño was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in 1992 and was commissioned by Uruguayan oboist León Biriotti with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA). Crónicas de Ultrasueño premiered on June 1992 by León Biriotti in Vancouver. A later version for B-flat clarinet and tape, requested by Vancouver performer François Houle, has been often performed. Two further versions were written in 1995 for Adele Armin (violin and tape) and Laura Wilcox (viola and tape). The piece has been recorded by Canadian oboist Lawrence Cherney and myself on the Centerdiscs label (CMC CD 4793) in 1993. Crónicas de Ultrasueño was selected at the 5th International Rostrum of Electroacoustic Music (IREM) in Helsinki (Finland, 1994).

Premiere

  • June 1992, León Biriotti, oboe • Concert, Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire. Neuman and AKG microphone were used for reciding the acoustic instrument.

Recording

En Febrero Mueren Las Flores

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1987
  • Duration: 15:28
  • Instrumentation: violin and stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Manuel Enríquez
  • ISWC: T0707591512

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612050

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

En Febrero Mueren Las Flores (In February the Flowers Die) was composed between June and August 1987. The piece simply expresses a personal lyric by means of contrasting colors, rhythms, textures and dynamics. The sound source for the tape part consists of environmental sounds combined with occasional FM microtonal timbres.


En Febrero Mueren Las Flores was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in 1987 using the Carnegie Mellon University MIDI Toolkit software for the composition of the tape part and of some sections of the violin solo part. The piece was commissioned by Manuel Enríquez and premiered by him in January, 1988 at the Mexico City International Electroacoustic Music Festival En Torno a los Sonidos Electrónicos. The version for Raad violin and tape was premiered by Adele Armin on June 5, 1991 during the 3rd CEC Electroacoustic Days, >>Perspectives->->, at Concordia University in Montréal.

Premiere

  • January 31, 1988, Manuel Enríquez, violin • En Torno a los Sonidos Electrónicos, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (Mexico)
  • June 5, 1991, Premiere of the Raad violin version: Adele Armin, Raad violin; Sergio Barroso, diffusion • >>Perspectives->->: Concert, Salle de concert — Université Concordia, Montréal (Québec)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire. Neuman and AKG microphone were used for reciding the acoustic instrument.

Recording

Charangas Delirantes

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1993
  • Duration: 16:07
  • Instrumentation: keyboard-controlled synthesizers and stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: CEE, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0705095119

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612060

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Charangas are popular dance ensembles in Hispano-America, particularly in the Caribbean area. Although the charanga instrumental format is often either a small brass group with percussion or a chamber group including piano, flute, strings, plucked doublebass, and percussion, the term ‘charanga’ is commonly and freely used for any baile (Spanish for popular dancing) ensemble.

Charangas Delirantes is an expanded display of this latter concept as a wide sound imagery ranging from the very basic spontaneous and rough Rumba-type groups (consisting of wooden boxes, spoons, and a percussive door) to the subdued and refined romantic bar-type piano or guitar trios and the noisy predominantly brass bands. In this sense this piece should be understood as a fictional and distorted perambulation through the varied and contrasting sound color and rhythmic world of leisure dancing.

Charangas Delirantes is scored in three different versions with a similar musical result. It could be performed as a trio (wind, MIDI guitar, and keyboard controllers), as a keyboard controller duo, or as a solo keyboard controller and tape. The sonic material for the piece consists of sampled concrete and FM colors. The former are mostly noises and piano timbres from a Haydn sonata performed by Vladimir Horowitz. The latter include all brass, percussion, and many piano sounds designed by myself.


Charangas Delirantes was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in 1993 and premiered on June 17, 1995 at the Music Gallery in Toronto. The piece was commissioned by the Canadian Electronic Ensemble (CEE) with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA). I premiered the solo keyboard and tape version on September 19, 1995 at McGill University’s Pollack Hall during the International Symposium of Electronic Art, ISEA95 Montréal.

Premiere

  • June 17, 1995, Concert, The Music Gallery, Toronto (Ontario, Canada)
  • September 19, 1995, Premiere of the keyboard controller and fixed media version: Sergio Barroso, keyboard; Sergio Barroso, diffusion • ISEA95_Montréal: Concert, Salle Pollack — Pavillon Strathcona — Université McGill, Montréal (Québec)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire.

Recording

Sonatada

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1992
  • Duration: 13:46
  • Instrumentation: keyboard-controlled synthesizers
  • Commission: Kathleen Solose, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0705250083

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612070

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Sonatada was composed for one DX-7(E!) — or DX-7IIFD(E!) — keyboard synthesizer and one TX-802 synthesizer as a multipiano piece in three uninterrupted sections related in different external ways to the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries’ tradition of virtuoso solo and concertante piano repertoire. However, the extensive use of symmetric and synthetic microtonal tuning systems exploits sonic situations inconceivable in the acoustic keyboard field.


Sonatada was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in 1992. I premiered the piece at a live electronics recital in Brussels (Belgium) in May 1993. The piece was commissioned by Canadian pianist Kathleen Solose with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA).

Premiere

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire.

Recording

Viejas Voces

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1993-95
  • Duration: 9:28
  • Instrumentation: viola and stereo fixed medium
  • ISWC: T0702965545

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612080

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Viejas Voces (Old Voices) for solo viola and tape is one of those pieces one has a special pleasure to write. I guess I indulged myself with intense memories of rhythms, moods, tunes, colors and gestures assimilated and enjoyed from the frenetic and lyric strong culture of my native country. Of course many of these memories are by now distorted by the efficient labour of time and distance. Like looking through a window in my mind with my old glasses. But then, that’s where the joy was. I listened capriciously to these old voices, abused my computer until it went berserk and gave me its voice in a state of absolute paroxysm, and then saw myself indistinctly as a rural troubadour or the big city carnival enthusiast writing a piece for viola and tape.


Viejas Voces was realized at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) during 1993-95 and premiered by Laura Wilcox on May 17, 1996 at the Music Gallery in Toronto. Thanks to the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA), my son Leván, Cuban violist Angel Lemus, and to Laura.

Premiere

  • May 17, 1996, Laura Wilcox, viola • Concert, The Music Gallery, Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire. Neuman and AKG microphone were used for reciding the acoustic instrument.

Recording

Tablao

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1990
  • Duration: 10:32
  • Instrumentation: stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Flores Chaviano, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0710377471

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612090

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Flamenco music has been around my ears since my childhood in Havana, on the radio, on recordings, the readings and plays of Garcia Lorca, and later on during my visits to Andalusía. The place where Flamenco music is performed is usually called Tablao. The piece contains the essence of different instrumental elements of that music in a dismembered way.

Tablao exists in two versions, for tape and for guitar and tape. In the latter the solo part plays the role of one member of the instrumental ensemble as well as that of the cantaor (Spanish for flamenco music singer) who in the middle section evokes elements of Cuban street vendor music rooted in Spanish traditions. The tape part mostly uses microtonal settings of FM synthesis sounds I programed and performed with a DX-7IIFD(E!) and a TX-802 synthesizers.


Tablao was realized in the Fall of 1991 at the Laboratorio de Informática y Electrónica Musical (LIEM) from the Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid (Spain) where I was invited to work with my old friend guitarist Flores Chaviano. The piece was completed at Ireme Studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada). It was commissioned by Flores Chaviano with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA) and premiered by him in Madrid in February, 1992. The Canadian premiere was presented by Montréal-based Colombian guitarist Arturo Parra in 1994 in Montréal.

Premiere

  • February 1992, Premiere of the mixed version: Flores Chaviano, guitar • Concert, Madrid (Spain)

Composition

About this recording

This version has been remastered at Ireme studio in Vancouver in 1995.

Remixing

Yantra X

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1982
  • Duration: 16:29
  • Instrumentation: bassoon and stereo fixed medium
  • Commission: Jesse Read, with support from the CCA
  • ISWC: T0703520799

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612100

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Yantra means ‘cosmogram’ and is an age-old set of Tibetan graphic symbols representing the cosmos. I used it as a device to generate random structures, tempo and dynamic concepts. Yantra X is the last piece in a cycle of instrumental works with and without electroacoustic elements on which I worked for over a decade.

Yantra X subtitled “de profundis” is an intimate and lyrical composition combining a solo bassoon with prerecorded and electroacoustically modified bassoon on tape. A recording score performed by Jesse Read provided the tape sound materials. These were subsequently transformed through complex settings of the Buchla 200 voltage-control analog synthesizer. Up to twelve tracks were mixed into the final stereo tape. The solo live part exploits the bassoon sound qualities and technical possibilities across the full register range of the instrument and beyond.


Yantra X was realized at the University of Victoria Electroacoustic Music Studio (British Columbia, Canada) between January and February 1982. The piece was commissioned by Jesse Read with support from the Canada Council [for the Arts] (CCA) and premiered by him in May, 1982 at the Utrecht Conservatorium (The Netherlands).

Premiere

  • May 1982, Jesse Read, bassoon • Concert, Utrecht Conservatorium, Utrecht (Netherlands)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire. Neuman and AKG microphone were used for reciding the acoustic instrument.

Recording

Canzona

Sergio Barroso

  • Year of composition: 1988
  • Duration: 12:23
  • Instrumentation: keyboard-controlled synthesizers and stereo fixed medium
  • ISWC: T0703521485

Stereo

ISRC CAD509612110

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

The title refers to the early Renaissance instrumental compositions bearing this generic term to define simply ‘an instrumental composition.’ The piece keeps specific contact with its sixteenth-century ancestors through an extremely dense and ornate polyphonic style, an open continuous structure, certain expressive moods and twists, and the smiling recreation of sound colors and compositional resources of that musical epoch such as echo and pian e forte effects. Except for the use of wholetone and harmonic series tuning systems, the piece is fully microtonal in order to achieve the resulting timbres and textures. The microtunings, ranging from quarter-tone to thirty-second of a tone, are combined in either complex single color or multi-timbral blocks.


Canzona was realized with a Yamaha DX-7II/E! keyboard synthesizer and a TX-802 synthesizer at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) in late 1988 and premiered shortly after in a recital of new music for digital keyboard I performed at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Canzona was first released on the compact disc New Music for Digital Keyboard, on the SNE label (SNE 556) in 1989.

Premiere

  • November 3, 1988, Sergio Barroso, keyboard • New Music for Digital Keyboard, Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada)

Composition

About this recording

This version was recorded at Ireme studio in Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada) between June 1994 and February 1995 — sound recording: Sergio Barroso; with the assistance of Michael Maguire.

Recording