electrocd

Track listing detail

extrémités lointaines

Hans Tutschku

  • Year of composition: 1998
  • Duration: 16:30
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • Commission: French State (Music Office), Ina-GRM
  • ISWC: T8015545128

Stereo

ISRC CAD509913700

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

To Francis Dhomont

extrémités lointaines uses recordings I made during a four-week concert tour in Asia in the summer of 1997. I recorded city sounds, the music of churches and temples, and the songs of children in Singapore, Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand. These unexpectedly rich sound worlds, quite different from ours, remain inscrutable even if they open doors for us.

For many years, I have been integrating vocal and instrumental sounds into my electroacoustic compositions with the esthetic concern to maintain the cultural context of the source. Even though in extrémités lointaines I use a wide variety of sounds resulting from travels through four countries, these connections remain very strong. The piece is structured in 15 sections describing different locations. The intensity of the impressions I experienced during the trip has resulted in a dense compositional structure.

[xii-99]


extrémités lointaines was realized in 1998 in the studios of Ina-GRM (Paris) and first performed in the original 8-channel version on 23 February 1998 during the Cycle acousmatique Son-Mu of GRM. The piece was commissioned by the French State (Music Office) and the Ina-GRM (Paris). extrémités lointaines has obtained a Mention in the Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition (France, 1998) and a Distinction at the Prix Ars Electronica (Linz, Austria, 1998).

Premiere

  • February 23, 1998, Son-Mu 98: Concert, Salle Olivier Messiaen — Maison de Radio France, Paris (France)

Awards

Composition

About this recording

Thisstereophonic version was realized in 1998 at the Ina-GRM (Paris, France).

Remixing

… erinnerung…

Hans Tutschku / Antonio Bueno Tubía

  • Year of composition: 1996
  • Duration: 10:17
  • Instrumentation: 4-channel fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T8003527105

Stereo

ISRC CAD509913710

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

In recent years the use of speech has been a central compositional concern. In … erinnerung… (… memento…) the recorded poem forms the starting point for acousmatic transformations. Apart from this text there is a second group of sources, which include bells and tam-tams. I used granular synthesis to cut the sounds into small pieces and played them back polyphonically to create dense sound textures. The resulting sonic intensity is a musical translation of the central phrase of the poem Yo os lo aseguro… (I assure you…) by Antonio Bueno Tubía: “I / assure you / the prison is there / I recall it like a lash to the face.”

[xii-99]


… erinnerung… was realized in 1996 in the studio of the Akademie der Künste (Berlin, Germany) and first performed in its original 4-channel version on 26 November 1996 during a concert at the Liszt School of Music (Weimar, Germany).

Premiere

  • November 26, 1996, Tage Neuer Musik in Weimar: Concert, Hochschule für Musik Franz Liszt Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Composition

About this recording

Thisstereophonic version was realized in 1997 in the studio of Klang Projekte Weimar (Germany).

Remixing

  • 1997, version 2.0: Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Les invisibles

Hans Tutschku / Karl Lubomirski

  • Year of composition: 1996
  • Duration: 12:37
  • Instrumentation: 8-channel fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média

Stereo

ISRC CAD509913720

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Les invisibles is a composition based on vocal and instrumental sounds which create a soundscape corresponding to the text. It was not my intention to illustrate or ‘set’ the text, although I do use speech as a sound source, and the comprehensibility of the text remains secondary. Les invisibles uses recordings of twenty-five short melodic gestures and five longer sequences, as well as a layered four-part vocal polyphony on the text of Es wird später (recorded in the studio by Donatienne Michel-Dansac, soprano; Catherine Bowie, flute; Antoine Ladrette, cello; Jean Geoffroy, percussion). By use of granular synthesis and by the control of special sound parameters (grain size, transposition, delay, speed, spatial position) the recorded melodies and sequences are processed to obtain dense layers of texture.

The compositional structure of the piece is based on the number five. There are five parts, each divided into five subparts. The harmonic material is based on five chords of five notes each.

[xii-99]


Les invisibles was realized in 1996 the studios of Klang Projekte Weimar and first performed in the original 8-channel version on June 2, 1996 during the Inventionen Festival (Berlin). Les invisibles obtained the First Prize during the 5th Prix international Noroit-Léonce Petitot (Arras, France, 1997).

Premiere

  • June 2, 1996, Concert, Berlin (Germany)

Awards

Composition

  • 1996, Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

About this recording

Thisstereophonic version was realized in 1996 in the studio of Klang Projekte Weimar (Germany).

Remixing

  • 1996, version 2.0: Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Sieben Stufen

Hans Tutschku / Georg Trakl

  • Year of composition: 1995
  • Duration: 13:04
  • Instrumentation: 4-channel fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T8016780761

Stereo

ISRC CAD509913730

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Sieben Stufen (Seven Steps) uses the poem Verfall (Decline, Decay) by Georg Trakl (1887-1914). All sounds are derived from electronic manipulations of two recordings of the poem spoken by four different voices (two in German and two in French), as well as four German key-words sung in seven pitches and their four corresponding French translations in seven different pitches: Verfall — ruine (ruins); Abend — au soir (evening); Glocken — cloches (bells); Vögel — oiseaux (birds).

The piece is structured in seven sections, representing simultaneously an approach and a distortion of the text. The durations of these parts are in the relation 12-10-2-6-4-8-1. Only after the seventh part does the text itself finally appear, presenting a counterpoint between the French and German versions. A retro-coda follows, which compresses the entire piece in reversal into 49 seconds. This contraction is superposed with the 56 sung words (four in both languages on seven notes). Compressions are also placed at the beginning of each section, these condense the following material into two-second ‘upbeats.’ In all seven sections the poem acts as a ‘sound-atom.’

[vi-02]


Sieben Stufen was realized in 1995 at IRCAM (Paris) and in the studios of Klang Projekte Weimar, and first performed in the original 4-channel version on 26 October 1995 during the Festival 8.Tage Neuer Musik (Weimar, Germany). The French translation of the poem is by Jean-Claude Schneider and Marc Petit, © Éditions Gallimard. My thanks to Pascale Condat, Armelle Orieux and André Schulz for the recordings of their voices. Sieben Stufen obtained the Second Prize at the CIMESP ’95 International Electroacoustic Music Competition of São Paulo (Brazil) and was a Finalist in the 1996 Bourges International Electroacoustic Music Competition (France).

Premiere

  • October 26, 1995, Tage Neuer Musik in Weimar: Concert, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Awards

Composition

  • 1995, Ircam, Paris (France)
  • 1995, Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

About this recording

Thisstereophonic version was realized in 1995 in the studio of Klang Projekte Weimar (Germany).

Remixing

  • 1995, version 2.0: Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Die zerschlagene Stimme

Hans Tutschku

  • Year of composition: 1991
  • Duration: 10:12
  • Instrumentation: 4-channel fixed medium
  • Publisher(s): Ymx média
  • ISWC: T8007981116

Stereo

ISRC CAD509913740

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

All sounds in Die zerschlagene Stimme are derived from the human voice and from percussion instruments. These sources were then transformed with the help of customized computer programs. Both sound groups are transformed in six stages. Percussion sounds inherit vocal articulations while voice-sound characteristics are transformed directly into percussion sounds, thus giving speaking percussion and a beating voice. There are several intermediate stages based on the mutual influence of the two groups, ranging from complete fusion to distinguishable distortion.

Originally for four channels, an essential factor in this piece was the ‘composition of space.’ I sought to translate ‘emotional space’ into physical ‘acoustic space.’ Feelings like fear and distress are placed closer than those expressing hope and dreams. The movements of the sounds in the hall have a direct relation to their transformation processes.

[xii-99]


Die zerschlagene Stimme was realized in 1990-91 in the studio of Klang Projekte Weimar and first performed in the original 4-channel version on 13 September 1991 during the Festival 4.Tage Neuer Musik (Weimar, Germany). Die zerschlagene Stimme was awarded the Hanns-Eisler-Prize of Radio Deutschlandsender Kultur (Berlin, 1991).

Premiere

  • September 13, 1991, Tage Neuer Musik in Weimar: Concert, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

Composition

  • 1990 – 1991, Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)

About this recording

Thisstereophonic version was realized in 1991 in the studio of Klang Projekte Weimar (Germany).

Remixing

  • 1991, version 2.0: Klang Projekte Weimar, Weimar (Thüringen, Germany)