Cabinets de curiosité Alistair MacDonald

Couverture: Shona Barr, Red Flowers (1992)
  • Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

The music on Cabinets de curiosité is just as colorful as the gorgeous artwork on the cover Noise Not Music

It’s a generally quite neat approach to found sound as a dominant source without any obligation to purity of its treatment, resulting in seven fairly disparate but certainly intriguing sonic environments. Chain DLK, ÉU

Stéréo

  • 44,1 kHz, 16 bits

Stéréo

  • 44,1 kHz, 24 bits

• MP3 • OGG • FLAC

Cabinets de curiosité

Alistair MacDonald

Quelques articles recommandés

Notes de programme

Cabinets de curiosité

Au 16e et au 17e siècles, les wunderkammern, ou «cabinets de curiosités», consistaient de fantastiques collections d’objets réunis, agencés et étalés à la vue dans le but de susciter curiosité et émerveillement. On pouvait y trouver des reliques religieuses, des oiseaux et des animaux empaillés, des coquillages, des artefacts issus de cultures anciennes et lointaines, des spécimens de minéraux et de végétaux, des peintures, des dessins… presque n’importe quoi, en fait.

Enfant, le «cabinet de curiosités» qui me fascinait était la grande radio qui trônait dans notre cuisine, avec son indicateur de fréquence de type «œil magique» et son univers de sons exotiques habillés de parasites. Tourner le cadran déclenchait une combinaison de langage, de musique et de bruit. Voici donc, ici assemblés, certains des sons que j’ai recueillis, puis agencés et étalés au fil des années qui ont suivi.

[traduction française: François Couture, viii-18]

La presse en parle

  • jckmd, Noise Not Music, 20 novembre 2018
    The music on Cabinets de curiosité is just as colorful as the gorgeous artwork on the cover
  • Girolamo Dal Maso, Blow Up, no 246, 1 novembre 2018
  • Stuart Bruce, Chain DLK, 25 octobre 2018
    It’s a generally quite neat approach to found sound as a dominant source without any obligation to purity of its treatment, resulting in seven fairly disparate but certainly intriguing sonic environments.

Review

jckmd, Noise Not Music, 20 novembre 2018

The music on Cabinets de curiosité is just as colorful as the gorgeous artwork on the cover (painted by Shona Barr). Though each of the seven pieces explore different territory, the title of the composition that opens the disc, The Tincture of Physical Things, is a fitting unifier. MacDonald’s ‘cabinet of curiosities’ isn’t limited to just found objects; it includes any sounds that struck him as distinctive or significant, from the handmade glass instruments of Carrie Fertig used on Scintilla to the sounds of public spaces in Final Times, described by the composer as ‘cinema for the ears.’ MacDonald also pays tribute to Delia Derbyshire and early musique concrète on Psychedelian Streams, using more basic processing techniques on memorable objects from his childhood like Slinkies, wooden rulers, and wind chimes.

The music on Cabinets de curiosité is just as colorful as the gorgeous artwork on the cover

Review

Stuart Bruce, Chain DLK, 25 octobre 2018

A compilation of independent works from sound artist Alistair MacDonald, ranging from 1997 to 2013, this collection of processed found sounds is a gentle exploration of everyday noises from which richer and less familiar aspects have been teased out and highlighted — sometimes with the mildest of touches, sometimes with a far more heavy-handed post-production-centric approach.

Opening piece The Tincture Of Physical Things initially seems like purely layered found sound atmospherics, but the grumbles of earth and fire build progressively and it takes time to appreciate the subtlety with which you’re being presented with something composed rather than just found. Final Times is also on the subtle side, while Bound For Glory (Postcard From Poland) is a rather straight-laced piece of train noise with very subtle layering and processing that reminded me of the recent CNSNNT release T. Final piece Wunderkammer is built from jungle sounds, treated with resonance most prominent on its bell-like notes to give a more dream-like layout.

Less subtle pieces include the Delia Derbyshire -inspired Psychedlian Streams, which adopts a Radiophonic Workshop-esque approach to sonic twisting but with a pace more frantic, skittish and spontaneous than anything I heard Derbyshire create. Pieces like the ‘glass instrument’-derived Scintilla are a touch more conventional, playing with tuned resonances and reverberation to create an inner alien world, and are counterpointed by the gravely growliness of Equivalence.

It’s a generally quite neat approach to found sound as a dominant source without any obligation to purity of its treatment, resulting in seven fairly disparate but certainly intriguing sonic environments.

It’s a generally quite neat approach to found sound as a dominant source without any obligation to purity of its treatment, resulting in seven fairly disparate but certainly intriguing sonic environments.

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.