Artistes Nilan Perera

Nilan Perera

Résidence: Toronto (Ontario, Canada)

  • Interprète (guitare électrique)

Ensembles associés

Parutions principales

Spool Music / SPF 305 / 2004

Compléments

Unsounds / UNSOUNDS 42U / 2014
  • Hors-catalogue
C74 Records / C74 007 / 2002
  • Hors-catalogue

Articles écrits

  • Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 1 novembre 2007
    This is a recording that engages in an almost offhand way but retains a curiously insistent identity all the same.
  • Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 13 décembre 2005
    Well crafted, instinctive and with the perfect combination of nail-you-to-the-wall attack and meditative buzz
  • Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 1 mars 2005
    The communication level between these musicians is incredibly high and this has given us a CD of some of the best moments of power and aggression…
  • Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 23 juin 2004
    … I was as intent on hearing the next event as I would be in reading the next page of an amazing novel.

Review

Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 1 novembre 2007

The one regional “sound” that’s immediately recognisable in Canada is the one coming out of Québec. Not so much in its Anglo pop vocal context but most definitely in the instrumental side of the music. This CD is definitely in the glitch pop vein and very much lives in the universe populated by the likes of Akron/Family and Pink Floyd. However, Trottier and Bernier retain the memory of Harmonium and the whole folk/prog movement that entranced Québec in the ’70s and ’80s. Record pops and glitchy samples provide a filmic ambience to acoustic guitar chants, and the music sometimes drifts into the electro acoustic space, which is also a salient feature to the identity of our Francophone friends. This is a recording that engages in an almost offhand way but retains a curiously insistent identity all the same.

This is a recording that engages in an almost offhand way but retains a curiously insistent identity all the same.

Experimental & Avant-Garde: Year in Review 2005

Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 13 décembre 2005

Martin Tétreault and Otomo Yoshihide are old hands at the art of the noise and you skronk kids should pay attention. Well crafted, instinctive and with the perfect combination of nail-you-to-the-wall attack and meditative buzz, 2. Tok is the middle and most dynamic of a three-CD set of live recordings. There’s lots of space, conversation and a wide variety of texture. On top of that there’s an odd feeling one gets that these two have listened to their share of pop music. And we are all better for it.

Well crafted, instinctive and with the perfect combination of nail-you-to-the-wall attack and meditative buzz

Review

Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 1 mars 2005

This CD marks the first in a series of releases by sound artists Martin Tétreault (Québec) and Otomo Yoshihide (Japan). The music has been drawn from a series of live gigs in Europe in 2003 and assembled into a series of 3 discs: 1. Grrr (distorted, aggressive, noisy), 2. Tok (fragmented) 3. Ahhh (smooth) and possibly 4. Hmmm (throwaways). 1. Grrr is basically full spectrum abrasion but not of the sometimes sterile world of more formal noise art, more reminiscent of drum oriented music and more specifically heavy rock, metal etc. These improvisers have managed to create music that has the integrity and compositional arc of songs and have done it pretty much with analogue tools. The tone of the sounds themselves remind me more of the crashing finales of the rock/metal world (Neil Young’s feedback-driven Arc comes to mind), stretched out and basted in the on/off schizophrenic babbling of electronics artfully malfunctioning at an incredible rate. The communication level between these musicians is incredibly high and this has given us a CD of some of the best moments of power and aggression since Never Mind the Bollocks. I can’t wait to hear the next instalment.

The communication level between these musicians is incredibly high and this has given us a CD of some of the best moments of power and aggression…

Review

Nilan Perera, Exclaim!, 23 juin 2004

The thing about John Oswald’s music that has always impressed me is that it is, quite simply, masterful. The sheer completeness of his individual works is something quite startling in and of itself: nothing, in my opinion, could possibly be subtracted or added. If you were to ask me about the “plundered” elements that form the music on this CD, I would say: thunder, the sound of water, single notes out of a piano, ambient drones, whispers and you’d roll your eyes when the new age warning buzzer would instantly go off. Nothing could be further from the truth. The two pieces on this CD total over an hour and they contain all the mystery, power and sheer craft of the very best orchestral classical music I have heard. It was a curious impression, considering the fact that I was listening to a sampled work, but one that kept recurring. My attention was not only kept, but I was as intent on hearing the next event as I would be in reading the next page of an amazing novel. The experience was very much the same. Some of the best plunderphonia to date, from the master himself.

… I was as intent on hearing the next event as I would be in reading the next page of an amazing novel.

En poursuivant votre navigation, vous acceptez l’utilisation de cookies qui permettent l’analyse d’audience.