Review

François Couture, AllMusic, 1 août 2001

Father of British acousmatic music, Jonty Harrison’s art runs deep and allies technique, poetry and a strong sense of sound spatialization. The works included on Évidence matérielle make no exception to this rule. The album begins with Klang, the oldest piece of this set and maybe Harrison’s best known work (it was released on two previous occasions and was awarded a Bourges Awards Euphonie d’Or in 1992). It is a beautiful, captivating electroacoustic concerto using sounds derived from two pots and electronically-produced sounds. Sorties (“Exits”) blends environmental recordings to musique concrète techniques to evoke the escaping, the fleeing of indoors for the outdoors. Surface Tension is the most acousmatical work, presenting sound for sound’s sake, a good example of the composer’s sense of drama. The two last pieces, Splintering and Streams, use prime materials, wood and water respectively. Here sounds retain part of their signification, but this technique results in less powerful works. They bring to mind Annette Vande Gorne’s Tao cycle. Some people will prefer these less abstract pieces. Anyway, Évidence matérielle is somehow more appealing than the dryer Articles indéfinis, Harrison’s previous release on empreintes DIGITALes.

Jonty Harrison’s art runs deep and allies technique, poetry and a strong sense of sound spatialization.