electrocd

Review

Alan Freeman, Audion, no 48, 1 juin 2003

And yet more Monsieur Dhomont! He is busy, isn’t he? Well, actually Jalons is a collection of eight works dating from 1985 through to 2001.And yet more Monsieur Dhomont! He is busy, isn’t he? Well, actually Jalons is a collection of eight works dating from 1985 through to 2001. A chance to hear some of his individual smaller works as opposed to big conceptual ones. There’s quite a variety to it as well.

This is even evident in the first track Vol d’Arondes which moves around a lot, notably nodding to Parmegiani and Bayle in its use of granulation and sound crunching, along with lots of nice subtle pitch delay. Contrastingly En cuerdas is Dhomont’s own version of a work he did with guitarist Arturo Parra, taken a step further away from Parra’s guitar, and all the better for it. Les moirures du temps is pure sonic fabrication, and shimmers almost indescribably, whereas the following Studio de nuit places that type of sonic structure against more clatters and crunches, along with snatches of text discussing aspects of human perception at night. Such invention continues throughout, in Lettre de Sarajevo with its angular concrete counterpoints and wedges of sound, Un autre Printemps different in that it’s a film score that uses snatches of Vivaldi, Drôles d’oiseaux all made up of chopped and mangled bird twitters, and finally the tiny closing track L’électro which amounts to a jokey collage of laughter and chattering. A chance to hear some of his individual smaller works as opposed to big conceptual ones. There’s quite a variety to it as well.

This is even evident in the first track Vol d’Arondes which moves around a lot, notably nodding to Parmegiani and Bayle in its use of granulation and sound crunching, along with lots of nice subtle pitch delay. Contrastingly En cuerdas is Dhomont’s own version of a work he did with guitarist Arturo Parra, taken a step further away from Parra’s guitar, and all the better for it. Les moirures du temps is pure sonic fabrication, and shimmers almost indescribably, whereas the following Studio de nuit places that type of sonic structure against more clatters and crunches, along with snatches of text discussing aspects of human perception at night. Such invention continues throughout, in Lettre de Sarajevo with its angular concrete counterpoints and wedges of sound, Un autre Printemps different in that it’s a film score that uses snatches of Vivaldi, Drôles d’oiseaux all made up of chopped and mangled bird twitters, and finally the tiny closing track L’électro which amounts to a jokey collage of laughter and chattering.